Poker Coverage: Poker Tournaments Casino News Sports Betting Poker Strategy

Newsweek Cover Attacks Online Poker

Issue Features Kid Holding A Tablet With A Royal Flush

Print-icon
 

A new cover from Newsweek features a photo of a child holding a tablet with some sort of online poker game running on the device. Despite holding a royal flush, the child kind of has a look of melancholy on his face.

In big black letters on the bottom reads, “Poker Face.” Since when did your poker face matter when playing online poker?

In all seriousness, the article goes into reporting on why, it argues, online gambling is of a concern to parents in the United States. The article is critical of moves by the Obama Department of Justice to let individual states decide if they want web gambling within their respective borders.

Right now, just Nevada, Delaware and New Jersey have legalized and regulated online gambling. States like California and Pennsylvania are considering legalizing the business in the near future.

Underage gambling is one of the chief concerns of the casino industry, brick-and-mortar and online. Many argue that the online space provides a greater ability to verify the identify of players, and thus check their age. Obviously, a success rate of 100 percent cannot be achieved in either a brick-and-mortar setting or on the Internet, the industry has admitted.

According to the Newsweek article, it’s the younger generations that are at risk.

“The millennials are greater risk takers; they’ve grown up on the technology of video games and watching other young people winning the World Series of Poker [also from Caesars], and they think they are smarter than everyone else,” says Jeffrey Derevensky, a professor of applied child psychology and psychiatry at Montreal’s McGill University and one of the world’s leading authorities on youth gambling addiction. On average, he says, 5 to 8 percent of university students are what he would classify as “at-risk gamblers,” with 2 to 4 percent suffering from “a serious gambling addiction.”

When kids do slip through the cracks, the consequences can be enormous, said Derevensky:

Once hooked, kids can take years to recover—or never recover—with the most severe cases only able to substitute one high-risk behavior for another. Some kids even commit suicide. “Once they’re addicted, these kids will take their parents’ credit cards, gas cards, anything they can find to gamble with,” he says. “I had one kid, being raised by a single mother, who stole two of her credit cards and lost $20,000 on PokerStars in one month.”

Players must be 21 in order to play online in the states in which it’s currently legal.

Proponents of online gambling say the risk is so low and the pros, such as stirring up economic activity and creating high-tech jobs in a state, are too great.

We’ll let you decide for yourself what to make of the Newsweek piece.

 
 
 
 

Comments

Scott44
over 7 years ago

With kids spending thousands online in legal games on apple and android devices I fail to see how much worse poker would be.

 
Reply
 

Henny
over 7 years ago

You'll let is decide what to make of this pile of crap article? Jesus Christ - you should be blasting it on the front page of your site/mag. Grow a pair FFS.

 
Reply
 

Zack2
over 7 years ago

ill have to check out the article, but im assuming the writer is biased and ignorant. clearly singling out online poker and making the game the face of gambling addiction when there are plenty of other games like blackjack n roulette to gamble on. which is quicker and easier (winning and losing) to learn and play. a young kid playing online poker most likely would not play high stakes. tom dwans dad gave him 50 bucks for online poker on his 18th bday. before you can even get into making a bet, each website makes you send in numerous paperwork and identification. they also track you with your phone. so it is not like porn, where i child can take a credit card and sign up. the only way for a child or teen can gamble is for an irresponsible parent to be lackadaisical about passwords and identification

anyway id rather have my child learn how to play poker than waste their money on table games

 
Reply
 

David103
over 7 years ago

Most online games even free ones to advance or really experience the full effect cost money. Game consoles cost hundreds of dollars and games sixty dollars more. I'm not saying kids should be allowed to gamble. But with reports referenced in the article saying 5-8% are at risk with 2-4% being problem gamblers. So we should penalize the 92-96% that have no problems. Doesn't make sense. Problem gamblers are going to gamble. I know a few. There's no stopping them. So might as well let the majority have fun and let some jobs be created and revenue made.

 
Reply
 

L2K4FC
over 7 years ago

It's blatant fear mongering. Its the new normal for "journalism" and it is pathetic. I agree with Henny that CP should not just be glossing over this article but should take a more pro-active position against this kind of negative press.

 
Reply
 

honkerism
over 7 years ago

Killer Girls and Middle East Crisis relegated to mini headlines, while online gambling is front and center as a major world issue.

I wonder what stake Sheldon Adelson currently has in Newsweek Magazine...

 
Reply
 

cardplayer1222
over 7 years ago

On site Casino businesses will be down if on line poker is allowed to be operated in US. Who wants to go to Vegas or Atlantic City or even Indian Reservations if they can gamble at home or even at work (during the break time).
Another issue, how the government can collect the taxes for all winnings? Regulate on line poker seems to be feasible but it is not.
One more issue, how to prevent someone who cheats on line since there is sophisticate technology to be used to see the other players hold cards to have an edge on the game.

 
Reply
 

pokertruth
over 7 years ago

ONLINE POKER IS BORING AND CORRUPT. YOU CANNOT BEAT A LIVE CASH GAME OR A LIVE TOURNAMENT FOR THE COMPLETE EXPERIENCE.

 
Reply