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Poker Hand Of The Week -- 3/14/13

You Decide What's The Best Play

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Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

There are 11 players remaining at two tables in a big buy-in championship event and with a stack of 945,000 and blinds of 12,000-24,000 with a 4,000 ante, you are sitting with a below average stack of 39 big blinds.

At the six-handed table, you look down at 10Heart Suit 9Heart Suit and raise to 55,000 from under the gun. The button, one of the larger stacks in the tournament who has been aggressively taking advantage of the final table bubble, three-bets to 126,000.

You decide to call and see a flop of 10Spade Suit 4Spade Suit 4Heart Suit. You check and your opponent bets 128,000. You have 815,000 left in your stack.

The Questions

Do you call, raise or fold? If raising, how much? If folding, what is your opponent’s range? If calling, what is your plan on later streets? Are you too deep stacked to move all in? Does your position as one of the shorter stacks in the tournament affect your decision? What does your opponent’s continuation bet on the flop say about his hand?

Danny WongWhat Actually Happened

Paul Klann, WPT L.A. Poker Classic champion was gunning for back to back titles when he raised all in holding 10Heart Suit 9Heart Suit on a flop of 10Spade Suit 4Spade Suit 4Heart Suit at the WPT Bay 101 Shooting Star main event.

His opponent, Danny Wong, immediately called with ADiamond Suit AHeart Suit and his hand held when the turn and river fell 9Diamond Suit 3Club Suit.

Klann was eliminated, earning $48,890 for his 11th-place finish. Wong advanced to the final table before running A-K into pocket aces to bust in eighth place for $91,120.

The eventual winner was WeiKai Chang, who earned his first WPT title and the first-place prize of $1,138,350.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

 
 
 
 

Comments

carlosjr24
over 7 years ago

I would have played it the same way.

 
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Kyle2
over 7 years ago

I really don't like the flat here preflop with T9 suited out of position. We've risked almost 15% of our stack preflop including another 8% to call the 3 bet raise. I most likely fold/shove this scenario with fold most likely occurring since this is too much to risk with our relative hand strength and position.

After the Flop: Personally, we can't hope for much better. This board has a flush draw, but nothing else really happening. Our opponent is highly aggressive so I like the Check raise all in with our relative hand strength. IT looks like a bluff/flush draw and can get called by some weaker hands.

I also would have liked to see a small donk bet of $100,000 would have been acceptable here to ensure that a turn card doesn't peel off. This also better prepares us to reveal our opponents hand strength if he raises or moves all in on us and reveals more information to his hand where we could release our hand if we read strength.

 
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Robert2
over 7 years ago

Well stated Kyle, I thought my analysis's where good, but not anymore! LOL!!!

 
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TMCC
over 7 years ago

This is a tough one because personally I would've folded preflop with that hand UTG, would've waited for better position and better hand, UTG is just a bad position all the way around. But if I had made this play, the 3 bet would've told me that I probably was beat here, even on a bluff I couldn't take that chance so late in the tourney with a weak hand like 9 10 suited.

 
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sqorpien
over 7 years ago

Id prefer an open fold here UTG with that stack size. After opening id prefer folding to the 3bet with my stack size and being out of position. After the flat I would check/call and reevaluate turn. Check/raise all in is awful because it just turns your hand into a bluff and rarely get called by worse (possibly 55-99 and flush draws).

 
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Jeff6
over 7 years ago

The mistake is definitely preflop. The best you're hoping for is to flop a draw & with stack sizes as they are you're simply not deep enough to flat the 3bet OOP. I prefer a fold preflop even with a sexy hand like T9hh.

 
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Leonard2
over 7 years ago

Betting T9s preflop UTG is probably more loose than you really want in that situation. He should have folded then and there. Mistake number 1.

When facing a 3B raise out of position, hero should have just folded. Mistake number 2. On the flop, with a standard polarized 3bet range (JJ+, AQ, AK, some junk hands for polarization) and a very wide c-bet range from villain, there is at least a 40 percent chance villain has an overpair (which he did). Hero might have equity against villain's range, but hero is either way ahead or way behind here. He needs more information. Shoving doesn't give him that information.

Checking the flop was fine, but the check raise all in was mistake number 3. What worse hands call? What better hands fold? Villain isn't going to be terribly afraid of pocket tens or a 4 in hero's range given the rest of hero's possible holdings. Plus if Hero did have pocket tens, he likely would have 4bet preflop. So it's not a reasonable thing to represent.

One way to possibly get out of the situation would have been to either raise villain's c-bet as a bluff and if villain comes over top, just fold. Or to flat call the villain's c-bet and hope to check-raise the turn, also as a bluff, folding if villain comes over top. Or if the turn goes check-check, just try to keep the pot small on the river, because a pair of tens in this spot is at least showdown value. Maybe stack sizes are too small for that level of maneuverability, but that's why hero should have folded preflop and saved himself the trouble.

 
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Doible
over 7 years ago

I would have folded due to position. But if playing I would have shoved to the pre-flop raise due to stack size. I put the villian on picture cards - not a pocket pair. Smaller three bet might have indicated pair.

 
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Jerardo
over 7 years ago

Posted this on FB, but will also post it here:

Villians range on the button with the read that he has been taking advantage of the final table bubble is pretty wide. 109s is a hand where I feel all options after the 3 bet are close (fold/call/4 bet).

In game I'd probably 4 bet all in as I think we pick up the pot uncontested so often. When called by AQ+, we aren't crushed. And in the case villian does have Aces, we have one of the better hands against it. The only problem is we don't have blockers to JJ+, so in the case we are called by JJ-KK, it would have been better to 4 bet bluff with an Ax blocker.

As played, I love villians small flop bet as it's a paired, mostly uncoordinated flop (except for flush draw possibilities) so he doesn't have to bet very much. I'd probably just call the flop bet to keep all bluffs in his range. I know it sucks that our hand is vulnerable to many overcards, and you may be faced with a tough decision on the turn if a J or higher hits, but I think avoiding a tough decision by moving all in is just wrong when it lets villian play perfectly against us. If we ship, villian will call with all that is better (or has high equity against us like a flush draw with one or two overs) and will fold out all his bluffs.

 
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Tim11
over 7 years ago

After calling the pre-flop re-raise, I would have checked the flop from first to act position. Assuming a 2/3 pot size raise from "villain", I would fold to the opponent's bet. With a big raise in presence of paired board and spade flush draws, would have to cave with the weak kicker 9. My presumption would be any over-pairs to 10s' or spade draws villain may have would make on a goner. Also, I would have considered a lesser raise from first to act position on pre-flop and react to opponent's action.

 
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Jim12
over 7 years ago

A six handed table and you're sitting on 10's. The $55,000 bet would find the guy holding a 4 and everyone else would fold (I haven't read how the hand went yet). You're still screwed as soon as someone calls or raises. I'd have threw the hand away. The next one would probably be A K, or something. Meaning, a better hand will come along, plus this is a tournament and should be played like its a marathon, not a sprint.

 
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Jim12
over 7 years ago

OK, I read how the hand unfolded, and yes, his raise doomed him to join the other few hundred not at the final table for the same reason (they raised on a weak hand). Although I'd probably fold that on the final table as well.

 
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ChicagoPack
over 7 years ago

You check pre-flop.

If you are so curious to see the flop and hit anything less than a set you fold to any large bet with a pair of 10's and medium kicker.

Betting the pair of 10's post flop and the AI raise was the 2nd warning shot over your bow.

Unless you hit a monster flop, you let the hand go and live to fight another day.
Anything less than a set on the flop and you fold the tent.

Your position and SS against an aggressive player in position and
the pre-flop raise was enough information to tell you they were doing what they do (be aggressive) and wanted you to jam there and then.
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Given that you called the RR pre-flop and post flop hit only a 10 with a small percentage to hit a FH or draw out to a flush with two streets to come and you go AI is suspect.

I would have checked my 10's post flop.
If aggressor goes AI at that point I think you have to realize you are beat and are only on a draw.

I think you thought aggressor was being themselves and pushing you off the hand post flop and you went with your heart and not your head.

I would have waited for a better hand to move in on villain.

Thinking and knowing are two different things.

 
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Gustavo2
over 7 years ago

first of all, thats too weak of a hand to be raising UTG specially when your playing the bubble and knowing that a big and aggressive stack is behind you, call might of been appropriate if you want to see the flop. number two, once you raise and get resistance you suppose to abort the mission (fold), instead you decided to invest 126,000 which is about 15% of your stack (too much). it should of been an easy fold a that point to minimize your lost and stay alive, you don't have a strong hand after all and have no position. the goal should be to make it to the final table with the largest stack possible, is not a good time to gamble.
after the flap you're still in bad position, i like the check but the AI move was really bad, that was clearly the OP's goal, you knew the bet was coming he is an aggressive player again the goal is to survive one more day, if i was in that situation i would call and see if i get any improvement on my hand like a T-9-FL draw and more info from OP.

 
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