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Poker Hand Of The Week -- 3/7/13

You Decide What's The Best Play

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Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

It is only the second hand of a major televised poker tournament final table with six players remaining. With a stack of 3,170,000 and blinds at 25,000-50,000 with a 5,000 ante, you are sitting in third place overall.

You are dealt 8Club Suit 7Club Suit and raise from the hijack position to 105,000. The button, a player with 3,345,000, reraises to 210,000 and you make the call.

The flop comes down 10Club Suit 6Heart Suit 3Diamond Suit and you check your gutshot straight draw. Your opponent checks behind and the turn is the 2Club Suit.

After picking up the flush draw, you decide to bet 335,000. Your opponent then raises to 800,000. You have 2,620,000 behind and you are covered.

The Questions

Do you call, fold, or raise? If calling, what is your plan on rivers where you hit your draw? What is your plan on rivers where you miss your draw? What type of hand could you put your opponent on that would warrant a fold? What does your opponent’s flop check say about his hand? If raising, how much? Are you too deep stacked to move all in?

Paul KlannWhat Actually Happened

On a board of 10Club Suit 6Heart Suit 3Diamond Suit 2Club Suit a the 2013 WPT L.A. Poker Classic main event, Danny Fuhs decided to call with his 8Club Suit 7Club Suit.

The river was the 7Spade Suit and he checked. Paul Klann thought it over for a bit before deciding to check behind, turning over KDiamond Suit KSpade Suit for the overpair and the winning hand.

Fuhs ended up finishing in fourth place, earning $316,650. Klann rode the momentum from that early pot to a first-place finish and a payday of $1,004,090.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

 
 
 
 

Comments

Jackal21
over 8 years ago

Simple call fold or call value bet. Getting priced good and he is representing real strength on a dry board and my call with weak holdings thinking you are making a play on a dry board scenario. This is why we don't call reraises with suited connectors oop.

 
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Leopoldo
over 8 years ago

easy fold turn

 
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Jackal21
over 8 years ago

Calling 20% of your stack to most likely double with a 5/9.5 pot odds draw is never an easy fold. ever.

 
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Ben3
over 8 years ago

If I invested 650,000 to the pot already I have to make a decision right or wrong on this hand. I just call knowing I probably have eleven outs in the hand to win it. The pot would be at 2,900,000 before the river card. If my opponent bets big and I've hit my one of my cards, then I may get the rest of his chips. If I don't hit my card, then I know just to fold knowing I am beat in this hand as well. If I lose the hand then I lose half of my stack. It is what it is. To win in a tournament at some point you have to take a chance. A lot comes down to knowing your opponent. If I know my opponent well enough, I may fold it based on his past tendencies. Someone I don't know as well, well that's another story.

 
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Kevin5
over 8 years ago

I agree with everything you said and at that stage of a tournament, you'd likely have developed some type of a read on the opponent.

 
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Petar8
over 8 years ago

The pot is 2.1 million, not 2.9.

 
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Kevin5
over 8 years ago

I think I fold here. The preflop action suggests an overpair and the lack of a continuation bet also screams large overpair. If you had JJ you'd want to shut down someone with AQ. If your opponent had AK why wouldn't he C-bet on such a dry board to figure out where he's at? The turn raise now suggests he wants to shut down a board that has become draw heavy. A10 makes no sense preflop. I put him Aces or Kings and fold. If he bluffed he likely did so with the best hand.

 
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Jerry4
over 8 years ago

I don't like the bet on the turn. I all kin of rides on this players past performance. Does he make it a habit of checking big hands in position when raised and over called preflop? The re-raise in position might have been a possible re-steele preflop, however the preflop re-raise combined with the check (with the lead) on the flop suggests a strong hand. I think a set is roughly what to put him on the flop. To check here with an overpair is just asking to be out drawn by Ak or more likely AQs. I wouldn't really mind the bet on the turn if you had more chips and the raiser didn't check the flop. He can't really put you on the flush draw or straight for that matter because of you out of position call preflop. He must think you are on faces or a good ace or maybe a mid pair like 99 or 88. 1010 also works here but would probably play them faster preflop to end the hand then. After the raise on the turn, I think it's a clear fold. He's asking you to put a lot if your stack at risk on a draw early at the final table. If you fold ere you still have plenty of chips to play with and patience is the name of te game. This is the wrong place to be rushing. You have made te final table and have a real shit at winning. Game on!

 
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Petar8
over 8 years ago

I agree, I'd probably check call the turn then can easily check fold the river if I miss. The chances of taking the pot down with the turn bet are not good considering the preflop 3bet. Villain's range are big pairs for sure. He is only folding hands like AK and AQ which would have most likely bet the flop. The 2c turn is also a bad card to bet on as it doesn't change the board and most likely didn't help your hand.

 
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Alexander5
over 8 years ago

I think the call pre-flop sets up the whole hand. It's speculative, at best, especially out of position. That early on in the TV final table, a pre-flop fold would have been the best bet. You lose the minimum and are still in 3rd position. With that said, once Fuhs gets to the turn, he can't ask for a much better drawing board. He has to realize that his hand in and of itself is going to lose 99% of the time at showdown. His only legitimate chance of winning at showdown(which is likely if they get to the river) is hitting his draw. A check-call on the turn ensures the absolute minimum this deep into the hand and if his draw hits, there's already enough in the pot to make the hand worthwhile and likely jump to either the chip stack or second in chips. A more conservative approach early on at the final table would be the best play. The dynamics of the table haven't been set and that may have been the first time during the whole tournament he's played with some of those guys. There's too many unknown variables at the start of the table to be taking unnecessary risks like this. I have to take the conservative approach and not give away chips unnecessarily. It's war on the felt and you can win the war without winning every battle. You have to be smart with your chips. Speculative, at best, and led to a 4th place finish.

 
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Joel2
over 8 years ago

I would fold!!! Your already behind with very few outs and the agressor is playing like he has something. The flop shows very little that KK could lose to. There were also too many over cards that could have beaten a 10 high flush on the river. Too strong a play to begin with in a major tourney.

 
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Jeremiah1
over 8 years ago

I jam the turn after his raise, but that's just me. Maybe flat the 565k and open shove the river with a 4,5,6, 7,8,9,T or club. Check fold the rest. IDK, just a humble opinion.

 
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Nathan8
over 8 years ago

It's tough. Flatting a 3-bet pre oop 60bb deep is something I wouldn't do with 87s. Especially against a competent opponent who is probably 3-betting a wide range. If he was only 3-betting TT + AQ then i could see a flat being ok. Kinda need to know the other players stack sizes for ICM implications so that we can decide how to proceed on the turn. I think calling is best allthough 3-bet jamming the turn might be better against certain villains. How do people proceed if villain c-bets 200k on the flop? fold? c/r? the error of calling pre is just going to compound itself massively on later streets (in my humble opinion)

 
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Nathan8
over 8 years ago

It's tough. Flatting a 3-bet pre oop 60bb deep is something I wouldn't do with 87s. Especially against a competent opponent who is probably 3-betting a wide range. If he was only 3-betting TT + AQ then i could see a flat being ok. Kinda need to know the other players stack sizes for ICM implications so that we can decide how to proceed on the turn. I think calling is best allthough 3-bet jamming the turn might be better against certain villains. How do people proceed if villain c-bets 200k on the flop? fold? c/r? the error of calling pre is just going to compound itself massively on later streets (in my humble opinion)

 
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dwaynebinette
over 8 years ago

I for sure call the re-raise at the start of the hand. With suited connects that's a no brainer and your priced in at that point anyway, lets see a flop. Well its clear he has an over pair, especially after the big bet on the turn, he is protecting his hand. The pot odds are a little weak at 1/1.66 on a call but there is a decent amount of outs with the straight draw and flush draw(13 outs) and its a nice pot. There is only one way to take this pot down though and I came to win. So that means I am all in baby, and I put him to the test. I re-raise him on the turn all in. After all he barely has me covered so he would be crippled, this is for his tournament life too then and he may not want to take the chance this early. After all there is a lot on the board that can beat one pair. especially with the draws, and if I re-raise now instead of calling then going all in on the river he can not make the argument we were chasing a draw and missed. It really reps a huge hand. His only option should be to fold and fight another day, thus the brilliant move by me to win the big pot.

 
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