Poker Coverage:

 
 
Buy-In: $6,568 + $422
Prize Pool: $2,593,443
Entrants: 423

EPT No-Limit Hold'em Main Event

  • Feb 16, '10 - Feb 21, '10
  •  

 
 

Updates on Day 4 (Feb 20, 10)

 
 

EPT Copenhagen: De Vivo snatches lead at end of Guldhammer's day in the sun

ept-thumb-promo.jpgPoker strategies change like the wind, from the “fold everything but aces” of the old school to the “five bet with air” of the new guard. But whatever the fashion, one truism will endure: if you’re on a heater, you should ride it.

Morten Guldhammer has been on the mother of all heaters over the past couple of months. He won a $1 qualifying satellite on PokerStars, arranged in conjunction with Denmark’s Ekstra Bladet newspaper, to earn his passage to the EPT Copenhagen field. He beat something like 1,500 players over two rounds even to get to the casino this week – but the story doesn’t end there.

_MG_3145_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Morten Guldhammer


Guldhammer tore through days one, two and three, always comfortable and always enjoying every minute of his (all but) freeroll. But that proved to be nothing compared with his heroics of day four, when he went from the middle of the pack to become this tournament’s dominant force in a matter of a couple of hours.

Morten_Guldhammer_OP6_Fouquet_out.jpg

Morten Guldhammer


“Massive chip leader!” Guldhammer declared as he cracked Damien Fouquet’s pocket kings with his jack ten, shortly after making his debut on the featured tabled. By that point, he had already knocked out at least three other players to give him the funds to foil Fouquet.

He kept up this dramatic show throughout a further three hours, always willing to set his chips to work. He doubled up a couple of short stacks when they were down to nine, but Guldhammer was the undisputed story of the day – reaching a high water mark of more than 3.5 million, before finishing with 2,033,000. “No one can beat me!” he claimed. We will see.

Of the nine players returning tomorrow for the final table, Guldhammer is the most unpredictable, the most entertaining and the one having the most fun. He is not, however, the chip leader.

Nine-handed play lasted for more than two hours – long enough for tournament officials to agree to play tomorrow’s final with the extra man, instead of the EPT’s usual eight. That passage of play actually allowed Italy’s Francesco De Vivo to stand firm with his stack of 2,073,000 and take a slender lead into tomorrow’s final.

Francesco_De_Vivo_leader.jpg</form

Francesco De Vivo: the tortoise to Guldhammer’s hare


De Vivo’s day four can be defined by two major hands: one a terrific call with a pair of aces, for his tournament life, to pick off Roberto Romanello’s bluff. He then eliminated Mads Wissing with flopped trip nines. That gave him the stack to sit tight.

The full line up for tomorrow is as follows:

Francesco De Vivo, Italy, 2,073,000

Morten Guldhammer, Denmark, PokerStars qualifier, 2,033,000

Roberto Romanello, UK, 1,551,000

Richard Loth, Denmark, 1,436,000

Anton Wigg, Sweden, PokerStars qualifier, 1,412,000

Yorane Kerignard, France, PokerStars qualifier, 1,164,000

Magnus Hansen, Denmark, 1,164,000

Jesper Petersen, Denmark, PokerStars player, 968,000

Morten Klein, Norway, 748,000

Those nine form an almost perfect microcosm of the full 423 starting field. Loth, Petersen and Hansen join Guldhammer as representatives of the strong local contingent, while the rest of Scandinavia has Wigg (Sweden) and Klein (Norway) to get behind. De Vivo obviously continues Italy’s fine showing at EPT events over the past couple of seasons, and Kerignard is there from France.

The British player Romanello has already laid one particular hoodoo to rest in making it to the final table. So far during this tournament, no overnight chip leader has made it through the next day. But Romanello has.

Roberto_Romanello_COP6_Day4_wrap.jpg
Roberto Romanello


The Welshman has overcome food poisoning, a long spell on the same table as Guldhammer, and that chip-leader’s curse. He could make it back-to-back EPT successes for Britain should he follow Jake Cody into the winner’s enclosure tomorrow.

Uncle Sam, however, has paid for his hubris. Hats off to the PokerStars qualifiers Paul Szyszko, Ricky Fohrenbach and Chris Dombrowski for going deep, but North America, which sent only a handful of folk to Copenhagen, will not be represented at the final table. That’s mainly because of a small almighty tournament beginning today at the Venetian in Las Vegas. Follow all the action from the PokerStars.net North American Poker Tour on the PokerStars Blog. Now! Do it now!

Ricky_Fohrenbach_COP6_Day4_out.jpg

Ricky Fohrenbach: missed the final table


Paul_Szyszko_COP6_Day4 .jpg

Paul Szyszko: out in 10th

As it must always be, we lost more players today than still remain. Among them was the Team PokerStars Pro Peter Eastgate, who fell short of his third final table of the season. His 80,000 Danish Kroner is among the smallest of his many, many career cashes, but at least it’s in his local currency so he saves on exchange fees. Up yours, Travelex!

Peter_Eastgate_COP6_Day4.jpg

Peter Eastgate: a min-cash is a min-cash


Also falling short of the last nine were the internet demon Andrew “tufat” Teng, and Andrey Vlasenko, who might have made his second final table of the season, but didn’t. Blame Guldhammer. All the players in the money can be found over on the prizewinners page.

Andrew_Teng_crippled_COP6.jpg

Andrew Teng


How they busted – be it banged to rights, caught bluffing or brutalised – can be found in today’s coverage at any of the following links:

Introduction: Making 24 look like eight

Levels 20 and 21 updates

Levels 22 and 23

Level 24

All this is also available in the anxious yelpings of Swedish. And then dodge the tumbleweed in the German or Dutch coverage of a tournament in which their combined efforts mustered only two min-cashes (both from Dutchies).

We will be back all guns blazing tomorrow for all the action until we have a winner. Keep your eyes peeled.

Crowd_Day4_COP6.jpg

Crowd. With eyes peeled



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 4, Level 24 (15,000-30,000 3,000 ante)

ept-thumb-promo.jpg10.15pm: You know what, why not stop now?

All the players and staff have agreed that the end of this level offered a convenient opportunity to end this one for the night. That’s it – we’ll play a nine-handed final table tomorrow.

A full wrap of today’s events, when we went from 24 down to nine, will be with you shortly.

Play is due to resume at 2pm tomorrow. We’ll leave you with the official end-of-day counts, which are over on the chip count page. —HS

10.05pm: Time for another break

We’re off for another 15 minutes. Another one of these, and they’ve had the equivalent of the 45-minute dinner break they wanted to postpone.

Things will start again at 10.20pm. Stick around punks. — HS

10pm: Chip leader bullied out

With Morten Guldhammer riding up and down the chip leaderboard, Francesco De Vivo has assumed the chip lead – almost by default as he hasn’t been playing many hands at all. His tightness was again indicated a moment ago when he opened to 70,000 from the cut off – one of the first times he has opened a pot – and Magnus Hansen re-raised to 215,000 from the big blind. De Vivo folded. — HS

9.50pm: Wigg whams Guldhammer

Anton Wigg, quite for a while nursing the short stack, just opened for 72,000. Morten Guldhammer raised to 172,000. Wigg then moved in and Guldhammer, rather predictably, called showing [kh][6h] to Wigg’s [ah][qs].

The board ran [7s][8s][qh][td][6d]. Another Guldhammer blow, down to 1,760,000. Wigg does his stack some good, up to 1,488,000. — SB.

9.40pm: What a fold

Morten Klein limped in from under-the-gun and picked up the two blind players to go to a [3s][ts][7h] flop. Richard Loth led for 110,000 from the big blind before Klein raised to 240,000. Guldhammer folded from the small blind but Loth moved all-in. Klein got up out of his seat and after a painful looking dwell open folded pocket aces. Loth then did him the courtesy of showing him his pocket sevens. — MC.

9.25pm: Another for Loth

Francesco De Vivo started things off with a raise to 70,000 in first position and was called by Richard Loth in the cut-off and Jesper Petersen in the big blind. The flop came [js][7h][9s]. Loth was first to bet when the action was checked to him. The amount was 135,000 and it was enough to make the other two fold. — MC.

9.20pm: Do nothing

Francesco de Vivo raised from the small blind and was called by Romanello in the big blind. The saw a flop of [tc][6d][2s], a turn of [6s] and a river card [4c]. On every street they checked it down. De Vivo turned over [jh][js] to win the hand. — SB.

_MG_8200_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Roberto Romanello


9.15pm: Three-betting is in the name

Roberto Romanello opened with a raise to 70,000 from early position. Magnus Hansen then made it 190,000 to go from the button. Romanello stared his opponent down but let it go. — MC.

9.10pm: Loth all-in

Richard Loth just pulled off a vital double up through Morten Guldhammer, who had just taken a chunk of his chips. Guldhammer returned them when he called Loth’s all in. Loth showed [ah][ks] to Guldhammer’s [ad][7c]. The board ran [kd][2s][4d][9s][3c]. — SB.

9pm: Loth left short

Get involved in a pot with Morten Guldhammer at your peril. Just ask, well, a whole host of people who tangled with him earlier and are now on the rail. Richard Loth isn’t out but is now left pretty short and will be wondering why he got involved.

Guldhammer raised and was called by Loth and Yorane Kerignard in the big blind. The flop came [5h][td][4h] and Gulhammer saw his 120,000 bet raised to 290,000 by Loth. Kerignard got out of the way but Guldhammer re-raised to 520,000. Loth only had 447,000 left but found a way to fold. — MC.

8.55pm: C-bet does the trick

Jesper Petersen raised to 70,000 and was called by Magnus Borg Hansen to go to a [qc][9c][2c] flop. Hansen checked and then folded to Petersen’s 100,000 c-bet.

8.50pm: Play…

… resumes. Level 24 here we come.

_MG_3169_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Morten Guldhammer


PokerStars Blog reporting team: Stephen Bartley, Marc Convey, Howard Swains and Simon Young.



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: De Vivo snatches lead at end of Gulhammer&apos;s day in the sun

ept-thumb-promo.jpgPoker strategies change like the wind, from the “fold everything but aces” of the old school to the “five bet with air” of the new guard. But whatever the fashion, one truism will endure: if you’re on a heater, you should ride it.

Morten Guldhammer has been on the mother of all heaters over the past couple of months. He won a $1 qualifying satellite on PokerStars, arranged in conjunction with Denmark’s Ekstra Bladet newspaper, to earn his passage to the EPT Copenhagen field. He beat something like 1,500 players over two rounds even to get to the casino this week – but the story doesn’t end there.

_MG_3145_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Morten Guldhammer


Guldhammer tore through days one, two and three, always comfortable and always enjoying every minute of his (all but) freeroll. But that proved to be nothing compared with his heroics of day four, when he went from the middle of the pack to become this tournament’s dominant force in a matter of a couple of hours.

Morten_Guldhammer_OP6_Fouquet_out.jpg

Morten Guldhammer


“Massive chip leader!” Guldhammer declared as he cracked Damien Fouquet’s pocket kings with his jack ten, shortly after making his debut on the featured tabled. By that point, he had already knocked out at least three other players to give him the funds to foil Fouquet.

He kept up this dramatic show throughout a further three hours, always willing to set his chips to work. He doubled up a couple of short stacks when they were down to nine, but Guldhammer was the undisputed story of the day – reaching a high water mark of more than 3.5 million, before finishing with 2,033,000. “No one can beat me!” he claimed. We will see.

Of the nine players returning tomorrow for the final table, Guldhammer is the most unpredictable, the most entertaining and the one having the most fun. He is not, however, the chip leader.

Nine-handed play lasted for more than two hours – long enough for tournament officials to agree to play tomorrow’s final with the extra man, instead of the EPT’s usual eight. That passage of play actually allowed Italy’s Francesco De Vivo to stand firm with his stack of 2,073,000 and take a slender lead into tomorrow’s final.

Francesco_De_Vivo_leader.jpg</form

Francesco De Vivo: the tortoise to Guldhammer’s hare


De Vivo’s day four can be defined by two major hands: one a terrific call with a pair of aces, for his tournament life, to pick off Roberto Romanello’s bluff. He then eliminated Mads Wissing with flopped trip nines. That gave him the stack to sit tight.

The full line up for tomorrow is as follows:

Francesco De Vivo, Italy, 2,073,000

Morten Guldhammer, Denmark, PokerStars qualifier, 2,033,000

Roberto Romanello, UK, 1,551,000

Richard Loth, Denmark, 1,436,000

Anton Wigg, Sweden, PokerStars qualifier, 1,412,000

Yorane Kerignard, France, PokerStars qualifier, 1,164,000

Magnus Hansen, Denmark, 1,164,000

Jesper Petersen, Denmark, PokerStars player, 968,000

Morten Klein, Norway, 748,000

Those eight form an almost perfect microcosm of the full 423 starting field. Loth, Petersen and Hansen join Guldhammer as representatives of the strong local contingent, while the rest of Scandinavia has Wigg (Sweden) and Klein (Norway) to get behind. De Vivo obviously continues Italy’s fine showing at EPT events over the past couple of seasons, and Kerignard is there from France.

The British player Romanello has already laid one particular hoodoo to rest in making it to the final table. So far during this tournament, no overnight chip leader has made it through the next day. But Romanello has.

Roberto_Romanello_COP6_Day4_wrap.jpg
Roberto Romanello


The Welshman has overcome food poisoning, a long spell on the same table as Guldhammer, and that chip-leader’s curse. He could make it back-to-back EPT successes for Britain should he follow Jake Cody into the winner’s enclosure tomorrow.

Uncle Sam, however, has paid for his hubris. Hats off to the PokerStars qualifiers Paul Szyszko, Ricky Fohrenbach and Chris Dombrowski for going deep, but North America, which sent only a handful of folk to Copenhagen, will not be represented at the final table.

Ricky_Fohrenbach_COP6_Day4_out.jpg

Ricky Fohrenbach: missed the final table


Paul_Szyszko_COP6_Day4 .jpg

Paul Szyszko: out in 10th

As it must always be, we lost more players today than still remain. Among them was the Team PokerStars Pro Peter Eastgate, who fell short of his third final table of the season. His 80,000 Danish Kroner is among the smallest of his many, many career cashes, but at least it’s in his local currency so he saves on exchange fees. Up yours, Travelex!

Peter_Eastgate_COP6_Day4.jpg

Peter Eastgate: a min-cash is a min-cash


Also falling short of the last eight were the internet demon Andrew “tufat” Teng, and Andrey Vlasenko, who might have made his second final table of the season, but didn’t. Blame Guldhammer. All the players in the money can be found over on the prizewinners page.

Andrew_Teng_crippled_COP6.jpg

Andrew Teng

How they busted – be it banged to rights, caught bluffing or brutalised – can be found in today’s coverage at any of the following links:

Introduction: Making 24 look like eight

Levels 20 and 21 updates

Levels 22 and 23

Level 24

All this is also available in the anxious yelpings of Swedish. And then dodge the tumbleweed in the German or Dutch coverage of a tournament in which their combined efforts mustered only two min-cashes (both from Dutchies).

We will be back all guns blazing tomorrow for all the action until we have a winner. Keep your eyes peeled.

Crowd_Day4_COP6.jpg

Crowd. With eyes peeled



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 4, levels 22 and 23 (10,000-20,000 2,000 ante)

ept-thumb-promo.jpg

8.37pm: That’s the break

Up a level, right after a ten minute break.

8.35pm: Loving the flop

Morten Guldhammer was on the rail shrugging off the hand, but the only concern for Yorane Kerignard is that he just used up all of his good fortune in one go.

Kerignard opened for 55,000 and Guldhammer re-raised from the small blind to 550,000, effectively telling Kerignard that he’d be playing for his stack if he wished to take this any further. After some thought Kerignard moved all-in. “Nice call,” said Guldhammer who would pitch his [js][7s] against Kerignard’s [ah][th].

The Frenchman needed to dodge a jack or a seven. The dealer flopped the cards, one at a time. [as]. Then [ac]. Then [ad]. It’s the dream flop you only see in children’s stories. Well, you know what I mean.

Guldhammer even made his full house on the [jd] turn. For those wanting to record all the detail for posterity the river was a [9c]. But by then the roars had lifted the roof.

8.25pm: Reaching out

A quick hello and welcome to our reader in Greenland. Hello.

8.15pm: First hand

On the first hand of one-table play, Yorane Kerignard raised only to see Morten Gulhammer re-raise. Kerignard called but check-folded to a Guldhammer c-bet on the [3s][kc][ad] flop. — MC

8.05pm: Chips and chairs

With the redraw in progress let’s have a look at how the final last table will line up:

Seat 1 – Jesper Petersen – 1,246,000

Seat 2 – Francesco De Vivo – 2,235,000

Seat 3 – Yorane Kerignard – 706,000

Seat 4 – Magnus Hansen – 1,165,000

Seat 5 – Anton Wigg – 957,000

Seat 6 – Morten Guldhammer – 2,664,000

Seat 7 – Richard Loth – 960,000

Seat 8 – Roberto Romanello – 1,630,000

Seat 9 – Morten Klein – 1,213,000

8pm: Paul Szyszko eliminated in 10th

The PokerStars qualifier had been quiet all day, but finally found a spot where he could open-push his remaining 230,000. Magnus Hansen called behind and they were on their backs:

_MG_3125_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Paul Szyszko


Hansen: [Kh][Js]

Szyszko: [ad][8c]

Szyszko, a PokerStars qualifier, needed to dodge some bullets, but the board ran an unfriendly [qs][jc][4c][9c][3s]. Hansen is now up to more than 1.1 million. — SY.

7.55pm: Set safe

A novel moment on the outer table with three players to the flop.

Anton Wigg raised to 57,000 and was called by Francesco De Vivo in the cut-off and Magnus Borg Hansen in the big blind. All three checked the flop, leaving [8s][9c][7d][kh] by the turn. It was checked to De Vivo who saw his 60,000 bet called by just Hansen. Hansen then led for 82,000 on the [3c] river and the Italian called very quickly with [8c][8h] for a set. Hansen could only muster [kd][jc] for top pair. —MC

7.54pm: Kreignard doubles

A double up for Yorane Kerignard who calls all-in the bet from Jesper Petersen. Kerignard showed [ks][9c] against Petersen’s [7c][3s]. The board ran [ts][6d][td][4c][2c].

7.50pm: Full complement

Morten Klein’s penalty has been served. He’s back in the game. — SB.

_MG_8035_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Back in business – Morten Klein


7.45pm: Wigg still trying

Anton Wigg continues to be active. He raised one hand and took the blinds and antes, then he raised next hand under the gun to 57,000 and got a call from Magnus Hansen. They checked down a [kc][2c][jh][4h][10c] board and Wigg’s [ah][jc] was good.

Next hand Francesco De Vivo opens for 50,000 – and then folds when Wigg ups

it to 166,000. — SY.

Talking of Anton Wigg…


Watch EPT Copenhagen 2010: Anton Wigg on PokerStars.tv

7.40pm: Talking a good game

Roberto Romanello had some fun against Magnus Hansen. Romanello made it 50,000 pre-flop and Hansen called from the button. “I check in the dark,” announced Romanello as the dealer put out [jd][4d][3d]. Hansen checked behind. “I check out in the dark again,” continued Romanello as the [10c] came out on the turn. Again Hansen checked behind. On the [3h] river Romanello put out a teasing 24,000.

“I haven’t got anything,” he told Hansen. “OK I will tell what I have, it’s king high.” Hansen called and Romanello turned over [8c][8h]. “It’s good to lie sometimes,” Romanello said. “But only at the poker table.”

Next hand, and Hansen opens with a 53,000 raise. Romanello is in the big blind. “Oh, so this is time to get me back?” Only Romanello called. The flop was [ac][2d][kc]. “Thats a a good flop for you to bet,” said Romanello, and Hansen did just that, making it 65,000.

Romanello folded. “Okay, that’s 1-1,” he said. — SY.

7.35pm: Loth doubles up

Richard Loth moved all-in for 484,000 with [qc][qh]. Jesper Petersen called and showed [ac][jh]. The flop put this one to bed, the board running [3c][ad][qs][3h][8d]. — SB.

7.30pm: Penalty

Morten Klein has just been given a penalty for acting out of turn, that’s five hands on the feature table that will only feature one Morten.

The crime occurred during a hand with the other Morten – Guldhammer. Klein opened for 49,000 which Guldhammer min-raised to 100,000, which Klein called for a flop of [kh][3h][6c]. Guldhammer made it 200,000 and Klein descended deep into the tank. Several minutes passed before Guldhammer called the clock. Klein eventually called for a [9d] turn. Both checked for a [qs] river. This is when the controversy began.

Morten_Klein_controversy.jpg

Morten Klein, during the controversy


Klein checked and the action moved to Guldhammer. At this point Klein mistakenly believed Guldhammer had called and turned over [ad][3d]. But Guldhammer had not called and now, realising he could not beat that hand, had no choice but to fold. But Klein had inadvertently prevented Guldhammer from betting on the end.

A one round penalty for Klein. — SB.

7.22pm: Just three-betting

The outside table has seen little in the way of flops since the break, but there has been no shortage of raising and re-raising. Twice now Anton Wigg has three-bet all-in to take the pot. Roberto Romanello didn’t have to commit his whole stack but his three-bet over the top of Magnus Borg Hansen’s opening bet was enough to force a fold. — MC.

7.15pm: Taking it easy

Nothing grand so far since the restart. Yorane Kerignard moved all in from the big blind after Jesper Petersen limped in the small. Petersen declined. — SB.

7.05pm: We’re back

Players are returning to the table. Play should resume shortly.

6.45pm: Break time

Another break after another level. Next up, level 23.

6.40pm: Mads Wissing eliminated in 11th

Francesco De Vivo wins a monster, busting Mads Wissing in the process. Anton Wigg started it off raising to 47,000 from the cut off. De Vivo called from the button, as did Wissing from the big blind.

On the [9d][8c][9h] flop, Wissing led out with an 85,000 bet, Wigg got out of the way, but De Vivo called. On the [3c] turn Wissing tried again, this time with a 140,000 bet – and again got a call. Finally, on the [jh] river Wissing announced all in for his last 600,000 – and once more De Vivo made the decisive call:

_MG_8315_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Mads Wissing


Wissing: [5d][7h]

De Vivo: [9c][10c]

De Vivo up to approaching 1.5million. — SY.

6.30pm: Turning tide?

A crucial double up for Jesper Petersen through Morten Guldhammer. [a][k] for Petersen against Guldhammer’s [ac][qd]. The board brought no surprises: [6h][9c][8s][3h][2d]. Petersen up to 1,856,000 while Guldhammer slips down to 3,000,000. That’s still the chip lead. — SB.

6.25pm: Second punch a knockout punch

Magnus Borg Hansen, still stacking chips from his double-up in the last hand, raised to 47,000 from the dealer before Andrew Teng, still in pain from that last hand, moved all in for 373,000. Hansen thought for a while and made the call with [ac][jc].

_MG_8213_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

Andrew Teng


Teng opened [ks][qd] and the board ran [ad][9s][3c][5h][8d]. It was all over by the turn and a stunned Teng left in 12th place for 155,000 DKK. —MC

6.15pm: Teng in trouble

Andrew Teng, one of the chip leaders at the start of today, is now in trouble after doubling up Magnus Hansen. Hansen had raised to 55,000 from the small blind, and Teng re-raised to 130,000. Hansen moved all for around 530,000 and got an instant call.

Teng: [ac][kh]

Hansen: [9c][9d]

The board ran [jd][qs][5h][2s][qc] and that was just fine with Hansen. He’s up to more than a million, but Teng is down to 373,000.

6.10pm: Video time

Amid all the excitement today there’s still time to look back on Luca Pagano’s week at EPT Copenhagen.


Watch EPT Copenhagen 2010: Luca Pagano on PokerStars.tv

6.05pm: Double up for Romanello

This is probably the second-biggest pot of the tournament – and has put Roberto Romanello right back near the top of the leaderboard. Here’s how it happened.

Andrew Teng opened for 47,000 from the cut off and picked up two callers: Anton Wigg on the button and Roberto Romanello in the big blind. The flop came [2h][qh][6h] and Romanello checked. Teng bet 80,000 and after Wigg called, Romanello raised, making it 201,000.

Teng had found out all he needed to know and folded, but Wigg moved all in. Romanello insta-called and must have liked Wigg’s question: “Have you got a made flush?” He did. Romanello showed [kh][10h] and Wigg was drawing very thin with his [qc][js].

The turn gave Wigg some more outs. It was the [2d]. But the [5d] on the river changed nothing and Romanello began counting his chips. He had 566,000 at the end there, so moved up to around 1.35 million. —HS

6.10pm: Learning lessons?

Jesper Petersen has learned the lesson others failed to adhere to, refusing to play with the fire in seat one, also known as Morten Guldhammer.

On a flop of [5c][8s][tc] Guldhammer made it 100,000 which Petersen called for a [qc] on the turn. Petersen checked and Guldhammer bet 200,000. No doubt aware of Guldhammer’s reputation, and the fate of others before him, he passed. Guldhammer then showed [7s][2s], taking the pot.

6.02pm: Guldhammer time

Well, well. Let’s start at the beginning.

Morten Guldhammer, who has a cast iron reputation now as being unpredictable, opened for 60,000. Damien Fouquet re-raised to 150,000 and Guldhammer plonk-called. The flop came [tc][jh][6d]. Fouquet moved all-in and boom, Guldhammer called, showing [j][t], ahead of Fouquet’s [k][k].

_MG_8342_EPT6COP_Neil_Stoddart.jpg

A victorious Morten Guldhammer


Fouquet shook his head, not quite believing what was happening. His tournament was at stake. The turn came [2c]. Fouquet had plenty of outs but would need one on the river. But nothing. [qd] on the river. Fouquet is gone. Guldhammer most certainly isn’t. — SB.

6pm: Pair’s good

Anton Wigg opened to 47,000 from under-the-gun and was called by Mads Wissing in the cut-off. All others folded before the flop came [5d][tc][7s] which was checked through, as was the [js] turn and [qd] river.



“One pair’s good” said Wigg. Wissing indeed had one pair: [6s][6c] good for the pot. — MC

5.55pm: Hansen damages Romanello

Roberto Romanello continues his downward spiral, this time losing a 330,000 pot to Magnus Hansen.

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Roberto Romanello


Romanello started with a raise to 46,000 from the button and Hansen called from the big blind. On the [ks][qs][6s] flop, Romanello bet 36,000 – call. The Brit made it 86,000 on the [ad] turn, and got another call. Both checked the [5h] river, and Hansen opened [10s][jh] for a straight to take the pot.

“Nice hand,” said Romanello. — SY.

5.50pm: “Likes a call.”*

That’s the end of Andrey Vlasenko. He shoved for 301,000 and was called by Morten Guldhammer, who has previous. Vlasenko showed [ad][kd] to Guldhammer’s [qh][th]. It was over on the flop, although there were some outs left over. [qd][jc][5s][9d][qs]. Vlasenko leaves in 14th. Guldhammer on the other hand is a chip leader. — SB.

* Quote from Bertrand Grospellier, describing Guldhammer’s style of play.

5.40pm: Six until we’re done

We return, with 14 players still left, spread across two tables of seven. You’ll notice this post has been set up for levels 22 and 23, but there’s an outside chance we won’t need them both.

Six more players need to bust and then we’re done for the day. This has been frantic stuff so far.

Here’s Morten Klein, the lone Norwegian in the sea of Danes:

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Morten Klein




This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 4



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 4, Levels 20 and 21 (6,000-12,000 1,000 ante)

ept-thumb-promo.jpg5.28pm: Break time

That’s the end of the level. All done for 15 minutes.

5.25pm: Wigg wham

Anton Wigg continues to take pots. On this one Mads Wissing raised to 38,000. It was folded around to Wigg on the big blind, who called. They both checked the [7c][as][6h] flop, but on the [5d] turn Wigg bet 48,000 – call. Both then slowed down again on the [4d] river – and Wigg turned over [ac][9h]. It was good. — SY.

5.20pm: Guldhammer blow

Morten Guldhammer opened for 36,000 on the button. Damien Fouquet was in the big blind and raised to 96,000. Guldhammer called for a flop of [9h][9c][jd]. Both checked and Fouquet made it 100,000 on the [9s] turn. Guldhammer called in the flash for a [6s] river. Fouquet checked, then plonk, Guldhammer dumped 100,000 into the middle.

Fouquet took some time over the decision, but called, mucking his hand when Guldhammer showed 66. — SB.

5.15pm: Italians go nuts as De Vivo stays alive

This is a very good call from Francesco De Vivo, who just extended his tournament perhaps all the way into tomorrow when he might have been out already.

The Italian raised to 38,000 from the small blind and Roberto Romanello called from the big. The two of them saw a flop of [as][ks][5h] and De Vivo bet 35,000, which Romanello called.

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Francesco de Vivo


The turn was [js] and De Vivo slowed down, check-calling Romanello’s 80,000 bet. The river was [5h] and De Vivo checked again. Romanello announced that he was all in, very comfortably covering De Vivo’s 300,000-odd stack, and putting the Italian on the brink of elimination.

He took his time but made the call, and Romanello instantly said: “Good call.” De Vivo showed [ah][10s] and Romanello mucked. — HS

5.05pm: Déjà vu almost

Andrew Teng was one card away from eliminating Morten Klein in a similar way to how he busted Ricky Fohrenbach. The button raised to 37,000 before Klein moved all-in for 436,000. Teng paused, asked for a count and then moved all-in himself. The button insta-folded to leave it at heads-up showdown:

Klein: [as][jh]

Teng: [jd][js]

The board ran [5s][3c][6d][4d][ac]. Klein hitting his three-outer on the river to stay alive. —MC

5pm: To the turn

Damien Fouquet just won a modest pot against Jesper Petersen. On a board of [9s][8h][jc][5d] and betting all the way, Petersen checked the turn and folded when Fouquet bet 120,000. Too much.

4.50pm: Final nail in the coffin

After being crippled just before it wasn’t going to be too long before Chris Dombrowski got the rest of his chips in. He moved his last 139,000 into the middle from early position and was looked up by Francesco De Vivo in the small blind.

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Chris Dombrowski


De Vivo: [kh][ks]

Dombrowski: [ac][4d]

The board ran [3c][jh][6s][7h][jd] to send Dombrowski packing in 15th for 100,000 DKK. —MC

4.45pm: Italian back from the brink

Francesco De Vivo moved all in under-the-gun for 165,000 and Chris Dombrowski moved all in from two spots to his left. Dombrowski had about 350,000. Everyone else got out the way and they were on their backs:

De Vivo: [8c][8h]

Dombrowski: [ad][ac]

That was looking bleak for the Italian, but the window card changed it all. It was [8d]. The next four out  were [9c][js][7c][9h] and De Vivo made a full house to double up. Dombrowski is now the man under pressure. — HS.

4.45pm: That’s more like it

A better result for Yorane Kerignard after he moved all in with [ad][qc]. Morten Guldhammer called with [jd][9s] and a board of [qh][6c][4d][5d][kd], taking Kerignard back up to more than 400,000. — SB.

4.40pm: Steve Vollers eliminated in 16th

Steven Vollers is out, after surviving as short stack for some time now. He shoved for 111,000 and was called by Morten Guldhammer who showed [3s][3h] to Vollers’s [as][kc]. The board ran [9h][4h][6h][3d][5s], the turn making the river card irrelevant. He leaves in 16th place. — SB.

4.35pm: The line up with two tables remaining

Outer table:

Seat 1: Francesco De Vivo

Seat 2: Roberto Romanello

Seat 3: Mads Wissing

Seat 4: Chris Dombrowski

Seat 5: Magnus Borg Hansen

Seat 6: Morten Klein

Seat 7: Andrew Teng

Seat 8: Anton Wigg

Feature table:

Seat 1: Morten Guldhammer

Seat 2: Richard Loth

Seat 3: Damien Fouquet

Seat 4: Andrey Vlasenko

Seat 5: Paul Szyszko

Seat 6: Jesper Petersen

Seat 7: Yorane Kerignard

Seat 8: Steven Vollers

4.30pm: Two table time

The surprise departure of PokerStars qualifier Ricky Fohrenbach in 17th place means we’re now down to two tables, the halfway point of the day.

There was a button raise to 37,000 before Fohrenbach moved all-in for 425,000. Andrew Teng was in the big blind and thought for an age before moving all-in too. The button folded to leave it a heads-up showdown:

Fohrenbach: [3c][3h]

Teng: [ah][9h]

The board ran [7h][6s][7d][js][6s], counterfeiting Fohrenbach’s hand by the river, sending him to the door with 80,000 DKK. — MC

4.25pm: Feature table action

Richard Loth has just taken a nice pot from Andrey Vlasenko on the feature table – small-ish, but he won’t complain.

He raised to 42,000 from the button pre-flop and Vlasenko called from the big blind. The flop was [8c][9h][kd] and they both checked. The turn was [7c] and Vlasenko led for 60,000, which Loth called, and the [5h] rivered.

Vlasenko bet 100,000 an and Loth dwelled a while before calling. Vlasenko showed his [as][9d] but Loth’s [ks][10s] was better. — HS

4.15pm: No back down

Part of the reason this is moving at such a pace is that no one is prepared to back down. A hand just played out between Roberto Romanello and Mads Wissing, where the Dane showed that he wasn’t scared of tangling with the big stack.

Wissing made it 42,000 from late position and Romanello called from the big blind. The flop came [7d][3c][5d] and after Romanello checked, Wissing bet 74,000. Call. The turn was [7h] and Romanello bet 76,000 at it. Wissing moved all in for just more than 300,000, and Romanello ruefully folded. — HS.

4.10pm: Klein caught with pants down

Morten Klein just took on Roberto Romanello and came off second best. He raised from late position and was called by Romanello to go to a [8d][3h][9d] flop. Romanello check-called a 47,000 bet before both checked through the [8c] turn. The river came [5s] and once more Romanello checked and then snap-called his opponent’s 125,000 bet.

Klein could only manage to show [ah][7c]. Romanello took the pot with [js][9s]. —MC

4pm: Guldhammer means “Gold Hammer”

Not since Chris Moneymaker has there ever been a more appropriately named player than Morten “Gold Hammer” Guldhammer. He has just sent Thomas Pettersson to the rail – another hammer blow, and more gold for him.

Pettersson moved all in pre-flop for about 150,000 and Guldhammer called. He was well behind, though, tabling [ks][8s] to Pettersson’s [ac][kh].

However the flop came [9h][qs][7s][10h][6h], rivering a straight around Guldhammer’s eight. Pettersson is out and Guldhammer is unstoppable. – HS.

3.55pm: Back from the break

Players have returned from their break and retaken their seats. The full counts will be on the chip-count page imminently.

Damien Fouquet is the current leader, with 1,750,000. Roberto Romanello has 1,400,000 and Anton Wigg is third with 1,250,000. — HS

3.47pm: Edging into the break

The two other tables had already gone off on their break, but Anton Wigg and Andrew Teng were still involved in a hand. Teng limped from the small blind and Wigg bumped it up another 21,000 more (in addition to his 12,000 blind).

Teng dragged his limp back into his stack and replaced it with a tower of yellows worth 100,000. Wigg laughed and folded and Teng showed him [qd][6s].

That’s the end of the level and there’s a 15 minute break before we return with 18 left.

Full chip counts are coming. — HS

3.46pm: Stig Rossen eliminated in 19th place

It isn’t over until the fat lady sings, or in musical theatre star Stig Rossen’s case, you move all-in with pocket sevens and get called by Damien Fouquet.

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Stig Rossen


Rossen opened for 27,000 from under the gun which Fouquet called from the small blind. Both checked the [ad][9h][4h] flop for a [tc] turn. Now Fouquet made it 40,000 which was called for an [ah] on the river. Fouquet checked to Rossen who moved in for 300,000. Fouquet waited a long time before calling, showing [a]6 to eliminate Rossen. — SB

3.44pm: Junker downed horribly

Denmark, shed a tear for Henrik Junker. He just got busted by Roberto Romanello in the most cruel way.

Romanello started it with a raise to 26,000 and Junker re-raised to 68,000. Call. The flop was [7s][qs][9c] and Junker slowly counted out his chips, before pushing 104,000 of them over the line. Romanello had the Dane covered, and announced: “All-in.” Junker called in an instant for his remaining 450,000.

Junker: [kc][kh]

Romanello: [ad][qc]

“You’ve got me,” said Romenallo. “I’m having a bad day.” But it was about to get a whole lot better. The turn was [10h], but the river was [qd], making trips for the Brit and sending the unfortunate Junker to the rail. That pot moved Romanello up to over a million once more. — SY

3.43pm: Teng takes

Ricky Fohrenbach must’ve looked at today’s table draw with a sense of fear as he has the two big stacks at his table to his left and they also happen to be fearless and aggressive. Andrew Teng is directly to his left and he’s just handed a load of chips that way.

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Andrew Teng


Fohrenbach raised pre-flop, bet the flop and the turn before checking the river. Teng called all the way and checked behind on the river too. The final board read [4d][as][3h][qs][4c] and Fohrenbach’s [kc][tc] couldn’t beat Teng’s [5c][5s]. —MC

3.42pm: Double-up for Wissing

Mads Wissing has just doubled-up through Roberto Romanello. It all went in pre-flop with Wissing’s pocket queens holding against the Brits pocket eights. Pot worth around 400,000 — MC

3.39pm: Guld-Hammer time

Morten Guldhammer has taken down another sizable pot and this time they came from Roberto Romanello. Romanello raised from early position and was called by Guldhammer before a [3c][9s][4c] flop came down. Guldhammer then led for 45,000 and called Romanello’s raise to 101,000. After the turn came [jh] Guldhammer moved all in for around 700,000! Romanello folded and started to chuckle when his opponent revealed [kc][jc]. —MC



3.35pm: Vollers all-in

Steven Vollers moved all-in from the small blind with just Richard Loth to call. Loth tanked for a while, at first nodding then tapping the tops of his hands for a bit. Eventually he called, ahead, showing [kc][9h] to Vollers’s [9c][8d]. The board ran out [qc][7s][ah][7h][qh] splitting the pot between them. Vollers survives. – SB.

3.25pm: Another (Guld-)hammer blow

Janne Nevalainen has just become the latest victim of Morten Guldhammer, who continues the heater of his life. It bears repeating: Guldhammer qualified for this tournament in a $1 tournament organised by a local newspaper in conjunction with PokerStars. Now he is in the last 20.

This hand was pretty typical of the way Guldhammer has been playing. He raised to 26,000 pre-flop from early position and Nevalainen moved all in for 220,000. Guldhammer called with a typical flourish, tabling [qc][jh].

That was dominating Nevalainen’s [js][10s] and the flop brought possibilities for all of them. It came [4c][qs][8s] – top pair for Gulhammer but a flush draw for Nevalainen. It didn’t hit, and in fact Guldhammer wound up with a full house as the turn and river came [8c][8d]. — HS

3.20pm: Here Wigg go

Anton Wigg is looking for another scalp as he increases the pressure on his outer table. Sitting on the left of Andrew Teng, the two of them just got in a tangle, with Wigg finally brushing the Brit aside.

First Teng raised to 29,000 from the cut-off, but Wigg, sitting on the button, bumped it up to 92,000. Teng was not done yet, counting out the 62,000 extra, then adding a little more than 100,000 more for good measure.

Wigg then made Teng’s hair stand on end. “I’m all in,” he said, so quietly that the dealer repeated it. Teng wasted no time in tossing his cards into the muck.

A little earlier, Wigg had raised to 29,000 under the gun, and got a call from Morten Klein (who had got no action with his aces the hand before). They saw a [10c][4d][8c] flop, and Wigg it 42,000 – getting a quick fold. — SY

3.15pm: Vlasenko wins one from Fouquet

Andrey Vlasenko just took a couple of hundred thousand from Damien Fouquet. The Frenchman opened on the button for 28,000 and was called in the small blind for a flop of [jh][jd][7h]. Both checked for a turn card [9c]. Vlasenko checked and Fouquet bet out 45,000 which was called. The river came [2c]. Both checked, Vlasenko’s [js][9s] beating Fouquet’s [ks][7s]. — SB

3.12pm: Peter Eastgate eliminated in 22nd place

Peter Eastgate is out, becoming our 22nd place finisher after being on the losing end of a hand against Jesper Petersen.

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Peter Eastgate


Eastgate had opened for 27,000, called by Petersen on the big blind for a flop of [jc][6h][qc]. Petersen checked, Eastgate made it 31,000 which Petersen called for a turn card [ad]. Petersen checked again before Eastgate bet 69,000. Petersen raised and Eastgate moved all-in, showing [jh][jd] but was trailing Petersen’s [th][kh] straight. The [7c] on the river changed nothing. — SB.

3.08pm: Cooler for 23rd

On the very next hand Magnus Borg Hansen raised from first position before calling the all-in shove of Kristijonas Andrulis in the small blind. It was a coller as Hansen tabled [ac][ad] to his opponent’s [kd][kc] and the board ran [9c][7d][ts][9s][9d], Andrulis takes home 80,000 DKK as well. —MC

3.06pm: First elimination of the day

Anton Wigg opened with a raise to 28,000 in the cut-off before Nicolo Calia re-raised all-in from the small blind. Wigg called with [as][5c] and the Italian opened [7s][8s] before the board ran [qs][ks][jc][9d][ac]. That seals the first elimination of the day. Calia wins 80,000 DKK for his 24th place finish. — MC

3.05pm: Calm before the storm

It certainly was the calm before the storm on table one where there have now been two eliminations in as many hands. First it was the Italian Nicolo Calia to bite the dust and he was quickly followed by Kristijonas Andrulis. Details of both hands coming right up. — MC

3pm: Junker
Henrik Junker and Mads Wissing are playing out one of those personal scraps within a larger battle that sometimes develop at about this stage. Junker raised to 32,000 from the cut off and Wissing raised to 66,000 from the small blind. Junker showed the [ad] but folded.


On the next hand, Junker again raised to 27,000 from mid-position and again Wissing, this time with the button, made it 66,000. Junker dwelled a little while but soon announced he was all in, which persuaded Wissing out of it. Junker took back the chips he lost on the last pot.


It’s been a good morning for Junker, especially in PokerStars Blog land. We (and by “we”, I mean “I”) reported that he was out in the last hand of last night. But in fact that was Jens Sundberg – it was a case of mistaken identity – and Junker is still in. Apologies to all the friends and family of Junker. Reports of his death had been greatly exaggerated. — HS


2.55pm: And here’s a video

This is the video team’s take on the start of the day…



Watch EPT Copenhagen 2010: Day 4 Introduction on PokerStars.tv


2.50pm: More from the outer tables

Paul Szyszko raised from second position and only picked up Henrik Junker on the button to go to a [9c][6s][3h] flop. Szyszko continued his aggression with a 30,000 c-bet. Call. The turn came [4c] where Szyszko’s aggression deserted him as he check-folded to a 55,000 bet from Junker. — MC


2.40pm: Stranger danger

The chips were going in long before the board read [2s][qs][5d][2h]. Peter Eastgate, brow furrowed more than usual, and Damien Fouquet playing with the abandon of a man with nothing to prove, had each put hundreds into the middle.


Fouquet checked the turn and Eastgate bet 77,000. Fouquet raised this to 154,000 which Eastgate then called for a river card [4d], making this pot worth 448,000. Now Fouquet bet big, 220,000. Eastgate called almost immediately, although we never got to see his cards. Fouquet showed [5s][5c], taking the pot.


Eastgate may be no stranger to feature tables, deep into main events, but Fouquet certainly is. This is his first live event anywhere. Anders Beckman, famous in Sweden as the actor in the Yellow Pages commercial, who sat with him on day one, pointed out Fouquet’s amazing story, noting how on that first day Fouquet had been making the basic mistakes common among rookies. “Now he’s the chip leader,” said Beckman. "It’s amazing. — SB.


2.35pm: A view from the outside

Some early skirmishes from the outer tables.


On table Romanello, Morten Guldhammer has been the most active player, and has had the audacity to take on the chip leader. The confidence of qualifying for $1 can do that to you.


There was at least 100,000 in the pot and four cards exposed: [8h][3s][jc][10d]. Guldhammer bet 40,000 and Romanello called. The river was [5d] and Guldhammer moved all in, for about 450,000.


Romanello asked for the count but when he was told, he mucked. “Good laydown,” Guldhammer said. “I had queen high.” He then tabled [qs][2c] to general gasps.


This earned him a few chips back after he lost some earlier on when Henrik Junker had moved all in, forcing a fold.


On table Teng, it’s Ricky Fohrenbach calling the early shots, but with mixed fortunes. He raised to 29,000 pre-flop and was called by Anton Wigg. The flop came [kc][3h][3s] and both players checked. The turn was [qh] and it looked like some chips went in – but it was right at the time Guldhammer was pulling off his bluff on the other table, and I was distracted. Sue me*.


Anyhow, they both went to a river of [6d], where Fohrenbach bet 99,000. Wigg called and they showed their hands: Fohrenbach had [ks][5s] and Wigg had [kd][jd]. That made the most important card that [qh]. It meant they chopped the pot. — HS


*Don’t sue me.


2.26pm: Level up

Play moves into level 20 proper now.


2.25pm: Early action

First blood on the feature table goes to Jesper Petersen with an innocent looking raise on a flop of [3h][qc][3s]. He followed up that modest pot with a nice meaty one against Richard Loth, who opened for 27,000 pre-flop which Petersen called. On the flop of [5h][jh][ad] Loth bet another 40,000 which Petersen called for a [3h] on the turn.


Now Loth checked and Petersen maintained the pace, betting 50,000 which Loth eventually called. On the [8c] river Loth checked again as Petersen threw out 85,000. Loth looked down at his cards again. “Eight-five?” he asked, and pushed the call over the line showing pocket kings. Petersen held ace-jack to take his second pot of the day. — SB.


2.20pm: We’re off

All the official announcements were made over the PA system before Thomas Kremser announced “Shuffle up and deal.”


1.50pm: A little administration

While we’re at it with the links, don’t forget you can keep track of all today’s chip counts on the cleverly named chip count page and do the same with the eliminations. Guess what we called the prizewinners page? — SB.


1.30pm: Welcome back

A good half hour until the start. When things do get under way we’ll play three minutes of level 19 at blinds of 5,000-10,000, 1,000 ante before things turn up a notch to 6,000-12,000, 1,000 ante. No sign of the players yet so twiddle your thumbs while reading today’s introduction, which you can find here. — SB.


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Peter Eastgate



PokerStars Blog reporting team: Stephen Bartley, Marc Convey, Howard Swains and Simon Young.



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Making 24 look like eight

ept-thumb-promo.jpgAnd so we enter the closing straight.

Four days ago, 423 players arrived to Casino Copenhagen to comprise what is commonly regarded to be the toughest EPT field of the season. There were major established champions mingling with internet sensations mixed in with the best “local” players on the whole tour.

Now 399 of them have departed and we have our final 24. But what do you know, there are major established champions, mingling with internet sensations and still a good smattering of the best “local” players on the whole tour.

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Tournament room


The full list of remaining players, and what they’re playing with, is over on the chip count page, and it’s also available in table draw order over there on the seat draw page.

All eyes go naturally to the top, where the British duo of Roberto Romanello and Andrew Teng are the only two players with more than a million chips. As detailed in yesterday’s wrap up, Romanello battled food poisoning as well as the rest of the field to emerge as our leader.

Roberto_Romanello_stacking_chips.jpg

Roberto Romanello


For Teng, things were significantly more comfortable. Known as “tufat” online, Teng went to the discussion forums last night to update his followers on his progress, telling them he had enjoyed a full day of “hitting sets and stuff everywhere”, flopping the nuts and making good on his promise to final table two EPT events, winning one, within the coming two years. That’s a bold boast, but he’s well set to make good on some of it today.

Andrew_Teng_chipleader.jpg

Andrew Teng


Skimming further down the list, the name standing out like a luscious Danish pastry in the late-night dreams of the starving is that of Peter Eastgate, former World Champion, Team PokerStars Pro, and inarguably one of the greatest contemporary tournament poker players. He has already made two final tables this season – he was second in London and eighth in Deauville – and a third is very much a possibility today.

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Peter Eastgate


Stick with it today. We need to squeeze these last 24 into a final table of eight. You can can watch all the action at EPT Live. Enjoy it.



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 4 seat draw

ept-thumb-promo.jpgWith just 24 players left, we’re down to three tables of eight. That makes finding your favorite player in the list below just a little bit easier.

While the purists will look at table one with interest, seeing as it has chipped-up Brit Andrew Teng and some other tasty stacks, we at Blog HQ are betting our last dollar that table two will be selected as the starting feature table for the EPT Live web broadcast. Why? Look no further than former world champion Peter Eastgate (seat one), and Danish star of musical theater Stig Rossen (seat five).

1 1 Francesco De Vivo, Italy, 269,000

1 2 Nicolo Calia, Italy, 193000

1 3 Kristijonas Andrulis, Lithuania, PokerStars player, 157,000

1 4 Chris Dombrowski, USA, 452,000

1 5 Magnus Borg Hansen, Denmark, 300,000

1 6 Ricky Fohrenbach, USA, PokerStars qualifier, 426,000

1 7 Andrew Teng, UK, 1,005,000

1 8 Anton Wigg, Sweden, PokerStars qualifier, 949,000

2 1 Peter Eastgate, Denmark, Team PokerStars Pro, 726,000

2 2 Richard Loth, Denmark, 737,000

2 3 Damien Fouquet, France, 934,000

2 4 Andrey Vlasenko, Russia, 641,000

2 5 Stig Rossen, Denmark, 529,000

2 6 Jesper Petersen, Denmark, 377,000

2 7 Yorane Kerignard, France, PokerStars qualifier, 243,000

2 8 Steven Vollers, Netherlands, 127,000

3 1 Paul Szyszko, USA, PokerStars qualifier, 761,000

3 2 Roberto Romanello, UK, 1,400,000

3 3 Thomas Pettersson, Sweden, 265,000

3 4 Janne Nevalainen, Finland, 216,000

3 5 Henrik Junker, Denmark, 263,000

3 6 Morten Klein, Norway, 621,000

3 7 Mads Wissing, Denmark, 303,000

3 8 Morten Guldhammer, Denmark, 592,000

EPT_Copenhagen_s6chips.JPG



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Romanello finds right potion to take lead

It takes all sorts of personal attributes to lead an EPT at the day three stage. Talent of course, some luck, courage, patience and a spot of good timing. For one player today though, the day would need just a little more.

Roberto Romanello has the chip lead tonight thanks to some Celtic poker prowess and an unlikely cure-all recipe, handed down from the mother-in-law of tournament director Gerard Serra. Serra passed it on to Romanello to calm the Welshman’s sleepless mind and food poisoned stomach, restoring order to both his game and internal workings.

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Roberto Romanello


The effects were remarkable. This hand-me-down concoction (recipe not for general release, although not unlikely to rule him out of any future Olympic competition) powered Romanello from 349,200 at the start to 1,400,000 at the close. All the more staggering when you consider the state of the Welshman’s stack on day one – just 6,000 at one point. Today he illustrated that by picking off a red and yellow chip from his three tiered tower of over a million. “Great comeback,” said Annette Obrestad watching on the rail. That summed it up perfectly.

Andrew Teng’s day took a similar route, albeit without the need of a nurse.

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Andrew Teng


Teng made it a British one-two by busting a string of players to take over as Romanello’s main rival. The size of the pair’s lead was easy to judge late in the proceedings when Teng was moved to Romanello’s left, their two stacks casting a shadow over the others, and putting the load-bearing capabilities of the table legs to the test.

Those two look the most likely source of carnage tomorrow, picking up where they left off today. But at least elimination for those less fortunate now comes with financial compensation. The bubble burst today after a drawn out spell mid-afternoon that featured no less than ten all-ins before Craig Hopkins fell in the 11th.

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Craig Hopkins (center) faces up to life on the bubble


Those eliminated included a few surprises, each detailed on the prize winners and payouts page. Roberto Romanello should take note that no overnight chip leader has yet made it through the following day. That curse applied to Csaba Toth today who’s earlier lead crumbled, instead turning into a 41st place finish. Bertrand “ElkY” Grospellier followed him in 40th place, one of 11 Team PokerStars Pros, players and qualifiers who cashed today.

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Csaba Toth


If Romanello and Teng are to hold on to their lead they’ll have to beat away some fearsome adversaries, not least the figure of local boy and former World Champion Peter Eastgate who bagged up 726,000 tonight, good for fourth place.

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Peter Eastgate


Even better placed was Anton Wigg from Sweden, in third with 949,000. That bunch, and the likely lads listed on the updated chip count page out to steal their thunder, should make the race to the final tomorrow a quality page turner.

We of course live only for that and head off now to be plugged back into our stasis booths until things restart tomorrow at 2pm, once we’ve scraped a few things into the ice lake across the road of course. You on the other hand can look back through all of today’s action at the links below.

Introduction: Who you calling fish

Levels 15 and 16

Levels 17 and 18

Levels 19 and 20

What can we say about our sister blogs that hasn’t been told before with casual innuendo and mildly offensive stereotypes? So check out natural blondness on the Swedish blog, the engineering on the German version and the, um, pages on the Dutch blog that were once below sea level. After that nonsense, let’s just thank Neil Stoddart for the photography and be on our way.

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So that’s it. Be back here tomorrow afternoon where we’ll have everything on the blog and live coverage on EPTLive.com. Till then.



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 

EPT Copenhagen: Day 3, levels 19 and 20 (5,000-10,000 1,000 ante)

ept-thumb-promo.jpg10.05pm: Top chips

As advertised, full chip counts are on their way. But here’s a sneak preview of the top three:

Roberto Romanello: 1,400,000

Andrew Teng: 1,005,000

Anton Wigg: 949,000

(Let’s not forget Peter Eastgate, with 726,000.)

10pm: Junker kicked in the proverbials; day is done

Jens Sundeberg is our last man out this evening, busted in pretty emphatic circumstances, by Paul Szyszko. The two of them got it all in pre-flop: Szyszko had [8c][8h] and was behind Sundeberg’s [10h][10s]. But those tens were rendered, well, junk, by the [kc][2c][8s] flop. The [8d] seemed like overkill, but it was actually just a safety blanket. The river was [10c] meaning our last player went out with a full house losing to quads.

The all in was about 250,000, so Szyszko is very well set for tomorrow.

The full counts for the final 24 will be with us very shortly, as will a full wrap of the day’s action. —HS

NB – Originally this report said Henrik Junker had been eliminated. That was an error.

10pm: The Dutchie got passed to the left

Ricky Fohrenbach has taken care of another player. He raised from the button before Pieter van Gendernen moved all in from the button. Fohrenbach thought for about five seconds and made the call with [ah][jc]. Off to the races as the Dutchman turned over [7h][7d]. The board came [js][ac][tc][qc][qs]. — MC

9.50pm: Two hands; two eliminations

It’s getting brutal out there, and Jens Klaning and James Bowey have just perished.

Klaning’s elimination went like this: Peter Eastgate raised to 26,000 from early position and after Anton Wigg called on the button, Klaning squeezed all in for about 120,000.

Eastgate moved all in, persuading Wigg out of there, and there were two of them left. Eastgate had [6c][6d]; Klaning had [ac][7c]. The board was totally dry and Klaning was sent to the rail. Eastgate is up to 570,000.

Bowey’s end went this way: Morten Klein raised to 26,000 and Bowey moved all in for about 120,000 from the big blind. Klein called with [qh][qd], which was way ahead of Bowey’s [kd][qc]. Ahead they stayed as the board ran [ac][as][7c][3s][6d].

Bowey out. — HS

9.45pm: Cold

This one is not for the faint-hearted, especially if you’re a supporter of Thomas Froslev. He just lost about 80 percent of his stack to Damien Fouquet in circumstances that are not particularly pleasant. (He was out soon after.)

They got it all in pre-flop, Froslev with [kd][kc] and Fouquet with [ac][jc]. Froslev flopped a set when the first three community cards came [6s][kh][qc] but Fouquet still had some outs.

The [2c] on the turn increased his chances further, and then the [10h] on the river gave the Frenchman a straight, doubling him up to about 600,000 and leaving Froslev very short indeed.

So short, in fact, that he was all in soon after with pocket twos, and was looked up by Ricky Fohrenbach and his king-nine. Fohrenbach flopped a nine and Froslev is out. — HS

9.38pm: Gentile not so fab

Fabian Gentile is the latest player to succumb. He got it all in pre-flop with [as][ts] but ran straight into Anton Wigg’s [ah][as]. The board ran [9c][kh][8c][4s][6d] before his exit was confirmed. —MC

9.35pm: Three times De Vivo

Francesco De Vivo has moved all-in three times in a row now. Still no takers, although in the last go Roberto Romanello thought about it. “Will you show if I pass?” asked the Welshman. De Vivo gave some tacit agreement and Romanello passed. De Vivo showed [jd][jh]. “I call,” said Romanello, only joking of course. De Vivo plays on. — SB.

9.30pm: Petersen re-sucks to stay alive

A swift roller coaster of emotions for Jesper Petersen, who looked like he was going to be bad-beat out of the tournament, but ended up re-sucking to double up.

Folded to him in the small blind, Janne Nevalainen raised to 28,000 and Petersen re-raised from the big blind. He meant to move all in, but ended up leaving a couple of towers of reds behind the line, meaning it was down to Nevalainen to four-bet and Petersen to call.

Petersen’s total was 212,000 and Nevalainen had about 50,000 more than that. Their hands? Nevalainen: [as][7h] and Petersen: [ac][jd].

Petersen was furious at the seven on the flop, but since there was also an eight and a nine, he had plenty of outs. The ten on the turn gave Petersen the straight and doubled him up. — HS

9.20pm: KK K’OD

Our $1 rebuy satellite winner Morten Guldhammer is still going strong and has just accounted for the demise of another player. The action folded around to Kristian Kofoed in the small blind and he moved all in for 114,000. Guldhammer mentioned something about not letting his opponent steal his big blind and made the call.

Kofoed: [qs][th]

Guldhammer :[ad][3h]

The board came [5h][4c][8c][kc][8h] and with that we’re down to 32 players and just four tables. — MC

9.10pm: Helppi out

Juha Helppi is not going to pull himself into the black for EPT events. He’s out. He told our Finnish colleagues at dinner time that he had seen only two hands of note today: one ace-king and one pair of eights. But when he found pocket jacks soon after the break, he probably ended up wishing they had been rags. He shoved them straight into pocket queens and is now on the rail. — HS

9.07pm: Double ups and drop outs

Kristijonas Andrulis opened for 83,000 and Thomas Pettersson moved in on the button. Something about the dinner break has hurried players along with their all ins and they come thick and fast. Andrulis eventually calls the extra 74,000 and show’s [js][2s] to Pettersson’s [ad][ks]. “Oooooh,” say a few people watching. The board ran out [6d][ts][7c][4d][tc]. A double up for Pettersson.

On a table along another all in, this time from David Adelskov holding [ah][jh], called by the animated Morten Guldhammer with [3d][3h]. The board ran out [td][2d][9s][4d][4c]. Another player gone. — SB

9.05pm: He can afford it

Chip leader Andrew Teng opened the pot with a 25,000 raise from early position that Peter Eastgate called from mid-position before Jesper Petersen moved all in for 87,000. Teng then re-raised all in to try and force Easgate out. Eastgate thought for a while, rubbed his head a few times but ultimately folded to leave it heads-up.

Teng: [kh][jd]

Petersen: [ad][qc]

The board ran [7d][as][3h][2s][8s]. Teng is still on 1.3million and can’t complain too much about that. — MC

9pm: Fohrenbach fighting back

Ricky Fohrenbach has built his stack up again after a slight hiccup before dinner. He and Pieter van Genderen went to a [10s][7h][9d] flop and then on to a [qd] turn. Van Genderen checked and Fohrenbach bet 36,000. But Van Genderen wasn’t done, raising to 72,000. Fohrenbach called.

The river was [7s] and Van Genderen bet 62,000. “Call,” came Fohrenbach’s firm response. Van Genderen showed [qh][5h] but Fohrenbach’s two pair, with his [9c][qs] was better. — HS

8.55pm: Thorsson’s run comes to an end

Kristoffer Thorsson is out. He had a short stack returning from the dinner break and doubled it up once – [ad][jh] versus Fabian Gentile’s [kh][jd] – but couldn’t beat Andrey Vlasenko’s [jd][jh] with his [qs][10s]. Thorssen has had an award-winning week, but couldn’t see it through to the weekend. — HS

8.50pm: Quaade out

Thomas Quaade is out in 37th place, taking away his apple and 65,000 DKK. He moved in with [jh][jc] only to be called by Magnus Hansen with [ks][kh]. The board ran out [7h][th][5c][2h][2c] sending Quaade to the rail. — SB

8.45pm: The final stretch

Righto, they’re back. There are 36 players left and their chip counts are all over there on the chip count page.

The prizewinners to date are all over there on the prizewinner’s page.

One player high on the first page and not (yet) on the second is our chip leader, Andrew Teng. He leads his fellow Brit, Roberto Romanello, by the smallest of margins.

Andrew_Teng_chipleader.jpg

Andrew Teng


8.30pm: Dinner time movies

One of the only Lithuanians in the field is still going strong deep into day three. He’s the PokerStars qualifier Kristijonas Andrulis, and he chatted to the cameras earlier:


Watch EPT Copenhagen 2010: Kristijonas Andrulis on PokerStars.tv


PokerStars Blog reporting team: Stephen Bartley, Marc Convey, Howard Swains and Simon Young.



This EPT is brought to you by PokerStars, the official sponsor of the European Poker Tour. Win your way into the biggest events Europe has to offer at Europe.

 
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