Poker Coverage: Poker Legislation Poker Tournaments U.S. Poker Markets

CPPT VI - The Bicycle Casino

$1,100 No-Limit Hold'em Quantum $500K GTD

Follow-the-action

Level 8

Blinds are up to 300-600 with a button ante of 600 for level 8. At the conclusion of this level players will take a 30-minute dinner break. The start of level 9 will mark the ...


Red Rock Casino Cancels Poker Bad-Beat Promotion After Scandal

Every Player From Jackpot Hand Last Summer Is Getting Paid

Print-icon
 

What has become an infamous decision by a Las Vegas casino to withhold payouts from a bad-beat poker jackpot from last summer has also signaled the end of the promotion.

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Station Casinos’ Jumbo Hold’Em Poker Progressive jackpot promotion has been scrapped. The promotion involved poker rooms at a handful of casinos around Las Vegas, including Red Rock, where the controversial hand occurred.

Under the promotion, a qualifying bad-beat hand would result in prizes for poker players at all of Station’s poker rooms, not just with the players immediately involved. About a third of the player-funded jackpot was due to “active” players at the casino’s sister properties.

More than 80 players were due at least $565, and that money reportedly is still being distributed about nine months after the bad beat was hit. Only three people filed complaints. The Nevada Gaming Control Board was tapped to resolve the dispute between players and the casino, and regulators in February ruled in favor of the customers. Station will not be challenging the most recent ruling, according to the report.

What happened has left a sour taste in the mouths of players involved, according to the report. The situation could have easily been avoided because the former promotion’s rules clearly stated that invalidating the jackpot for prematurely exposing your cards is “at the discretion of management.”

The jackpot stood at about $120,000 back in July when 83-year-old Avi Shamir lost with a straight flush to a higher one from a poker player by the name of Len Schreter. Shamir was in-line to collect $60,000 for losing, while Schreter was going to pocket $30,000.

However, Red Rock examined video footage of the hand and decided to invalidate the jackpot because Schreter turned over his two cards prior to the end of the hand. He exposed his cards after the river card was dealt, but before the final round of betting had been completed.

Poker players know that such a mistake didn’t impact the action here.

Bad-beat jackpots are sometimes major draws for poker rooms, assuming nothing goes wrong. A record $1 million jackpot was hit back in January at a casino in Detroit.

 
 
Tags: Red Rock,   Bad Beat,   Promotion,   Nevada,   Las Vegas