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Gus Hansen Says 2008 Poker Book Hurt His Career

'Great Dane' Returns To Las Vegas For Tournament

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Credit: WPT.comThough he plays seldomly these days, Gus Hansen is still one of poker’s legends thanks to his work helping popularize the game in the 2000s. However, he believes that his 2008 poker book entitled “Every Hand Revealed” made it harder for him to win at the tables.

Hansen recently made an appearance at this month’s WPT Five Diamond World Poker Classic at Bellagio in Las Vegas. He failed to make the money, which he hasn’t done in a major tournament since 2014. Hansen apparently has been revamping his game, in an era when the average skill level of his competitors has increased significantly.

Hansen’s troubles at the internet poker tables were well-documented during a mind-blowing downswing that saw his online losses pass the $20-million mark. Around $17 million of those losses came between 2012 and 2014. The struggles in cyberspace were mirrored in the brick-and-mortar poker rooms. In an interview with the WPT, Hansen admitted that his poker book had a negative impact on his table image. Every Hand Revealed was a hand-by-hand breakdown of his 2007 Aussie Millions win, which gave readers a look into his thought processes.

“What really changed a lot was after my book came out, it seemed like people just never believed I had a hand, in their mind,” Hansen said.

The three-time WPT champion believes he did a poor job taking into account his image as a loose and aggressive player at the tables. Hansen has also admitted to some tilt issues.

“I don’t think I did a good job of adjusting because as we all know, I like to play a lot of hands," Hansen added. "I made a lot of mistakes along the way not adjusting to the perceived image of me. Now, I haven’t played in a long time so maybe sometimes they believe I have something.”

That image was especially challenging because the weakest players in the field learned, according to Hansen, to “put pressure on you.”

“The good players are better and what’s probably more important is the bad players have gotten better,” he said. “You could find a lot of bad players back in the day."

Hansen told the WPT that he there’s “a chance” he plays more tournaments in 2018, now that he’s “getting into a rhythm” at the tables. “I have to re-discover and re-invent things,” Hansen said.

 
 
 
 

Comments

Bluesbuster
1 month ago

One of my favorite poker books. Mode lots of side notes while reading it.

 
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PATENTATTORNEY2
1 month ago

ASSUMING THAT HANSEN HAD A SECRET WINNING METHOD HE WAS FOOLISH TO PUBLICLY DIVULGE IT IN A BOOK. HE PROBABLY MADE VERY LITTLE PROFIT FROM BOOK SALES BUT IT COST HIM MILLIONS IN PLAY WINNIGS.

 
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Barry2
1 month ago

He did discover to defend the BB wide vs min-raises. First book that recommended that move.

 
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ThomasKeenan
1 month ago

I think not actually being that good at poker hurt his career. He may have been a pioneer changing how people play tournament poker, but he lacked many of the skills (discipline, game selection) that go into a "good poker player." Losing live career, losing online career. He's a losing player who managed to run good during the crux of the poker boom. Only thing he ever made money off was his brand and that free full tilt money.

 
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Lassedrengen
1 month ago

I'm pretty sure he made the majority of his money from being a world-class backgammon player.
But it is true that he did lack a lot of the skills that excellent poker players have, like discipline, game selection, bank roll management etc.

 
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