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Poker Hand of the Week: 10/16/14

You Decide What's The Best Play

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Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

There are 27 players remaining in a major international tournament and you are already in the money. The tournament is being played eight-handed, so there are still three players who need to bust in order to make it to the next pay jump.

With a stack of 91,000 and blinds of 3,000-6,000 with a 1,000 ante, you are among the short stacks, but still have some room to maneuver. The action folds around to you in the cutoff and you look down at JClub Suit10Club Suit.

Hoping to take down the pot with a preflop raise, you make it 12,000 and are called by a well-known pro in the big blind. The flop comes down KClub Suit7Club Suit2Diamond Suit.

The big blind checks and you continue for 12,000 with your flush draw. Your opponent then check raises to 32,000. You have 66,000 behind.

The Questions

Do you call, raise or fold? If calling, what is your plan for non-club turn cards? What are some reasons for folding? Is it profitable to shove in this situation, given you have little fold equity? What range of hands would your opponent check-raise this flop with?

What Actually Happened

After some deliberation at the 2014 WSOP APAC main event, Dylan Honeyman opted to move all in with his JClub Suit10Club Suit on a flop of KClub Suit7Club Suit2Diamond Suit.

JJ Liu was priced in and made the call with 9Club Suit8Club Suit, much to Honeyman’s delight. Unfortunately, the turn and river fell 6Diamond Suit8Heart Suit, giving the pot to Liu and sending Honeyman to the rail in 27th place, for which he earned AUD $21,566.

Liu eventually busted in 13th place, banking AUD $31,880.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

 
 
 
 

Comments

NoFear
almost 7 years ago

The Questions

Do you call, raise or fold? If calling, what is your plan for non-club turn cards? What are some reasons for folding? Is it profitable to shove in this situation, given you have little fold equity? What range of hands would your opponent check-raise this flop with?

Answers
I raise all in - there is some fold equity as my opponent could fold a medium or small pocket pair, or a pair of 7s with a hand like 8 7, or a bluff. Furthermore, my opponent could have a smaller flush draw (only two higher flush draws are possible) in which case my J high is good. And I have too many outs to give up if called and I'm beat - from 15 outs (against pocket 9s or 8 7, etc.), to 9 outs against Kx - plus some weird backdoor straight or runner runner pair draws. Doubling up is too valuable to trade for a fold with 11 BBs remaining. My odds of winning this hand give me more positive EV than a fold in my opinion.

Oh, and calling is the worst play! 5 out of 6 times I miss the club and even if I hit I may not get paid off, and trying to run a bluff on a non club turn when flat calling the flop has a low probability of working with only 46K behind to shove. Opponent has first action so if he shoves you have no chance to bluff.

 
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gjpure
almost 7 years ago

The size of chip stack is such that any kind of chipping up is very significant. We need to put ourselfs is a position to make the next pay jump with little risk. For this reason I think a raise closer to 2.5x on the button would have been better just to encourage the blinds to fold and pick up some dead money. Second, on a flop such as this we could probablly shove and only get called by a K. We don't know what our opponenets chip stack is, but if they are in that 20-40bb range this would really put pressure on them to fold. But even if out opponent has a big stack we still have to go with this flop considering our chip stack size. We need to accumulate chips and this is as good as chance as any.

 
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Rumple
almost 7 years ago

We have 15 big blinds. Pretty sure villain has us covered every time.

This is definitely a shove because a) we are not folding this with 15 bb's and b) calling is horrible as we'll be left with 40k in a pot over 97k. If we call we are pretty pot stuck. Clear raise. Or if you really want to be a nit you can just fold.

 
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JulioRodriguez
almost 7 years ago

The chart above shows villain started the hand with 238,000.