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Poker Hand Of The Week -- 5/31/13

You Decide What's The Best Play

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Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Scenario

You are three-handed in a major tournament and have a slight chip lead with 5,550,000 and blinds of 60,000-120,000 with a 20,000 ante (46 big blinds). Your opponents are both aggressive. The short stack in the tournament has 3,725,000 (31 big blinds).

On the button, you look down at ADiamond Suit 10Diamond Suit and raise to 250,000. The small blind, a player who started the hand with 5,330,000 (44 big blinds), three-bets to 670,000.

Having position, you decide to call and the flop comes KDiamond Suit 10Club Suit 8Diamond Suit. Your opponent bets 620,000 and you make the call. The turn is the QHeart Suit and your opponent bets 1,310,000.

There is more than 5.3 million currently in the pot and your opponent has 2,710,000 behind his bet, with you having him slightly covered.

The Questions

Do you call, raise or fold? If calling, do you expect to get any additional value if a diamond or a jack hit the river? Is there any reason to fold, considering how strong of a draw you are holding? If raising, are you doing so for value, or as a bluff? What kinds of hands are in your opponent’s range? What non-diamond, non-ten, non-jack cards on the river will make you consider value betting if checked to?

Chino RheemWhat Actually Happened

After thinking it over for a few minutes at the 2013 World Poker Tour Championship, Chino Rheem elected to just call with his ADiamond Suit 10Diamond Suit on a board reading KDiamond Suit 10Club Suit 8Diamond Suit QHeart Suit.

The river was the 3Diamond Suit and his opponent, Jonathan Roy, moved all in for 2,710,000. Rheem immediately called with the nut flush and Roy could only shake his head as he revealed 8Club Suit 8Heart Suit for a flopped set.

Roy was eliminated in third place, earning $421,800. Rheem went on to win the tournament, defeating Erick Lindgren and earning his second WPT title and the $1,150,297 first-place prize.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

 
 
 
 

Comments

Dale3
over 7 years ago

I would go all in, betting against a pair. Could've hit flush, straight, top pair, 2 pair. I would have played the odds to my advantage!

 
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Douglas2
over 7 years ago

4.2:1 hand 4.1:1 pot odds. I'd just call. Probably expect small value if I hit it. I wouldn't kick a guy for folding though. :) (I haven't read the outcome yet)

 
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betandpray
over 7 years ago

I think I would have just called for the reason of if a diamond doesn't come I could still lay down my hand. If the diamond does come and does't pair the board then the pot was big enough so even if my opponent didn't flop a set I would be in great shape collecting just the 5.3 million dollar pot. If a diamond doesn't come and I mucked my hand I would still have almost 30 big blinds left and three handed that would still give me plenty of options and chances to rebuild my stack and win the tournament. If a non diamond card hits the river I don't know if I make a value bet unless it doesn't pair the board or help in a straight situation. I would have to be present to know how my opponents were playing and trust my read at that point to make a decision.

 
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Douglas2
over 7 years ago

I think if you're planning to bluff in that situation go ahead and push all in representing the straight on the turn. No way I would value bet if I missed. I might believe somebody called with 9 J diamonds though.

 
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Sean13
over 7 years ago

I would have played it exactly as our hero did. Another option is to pot commit yourself preflop considering how strong your hand is.
Hero's play on the turn is correct because you're shoving with what's likely to be the worst hand and there's very little fold equity, a hand as bad as a pair of queens could call you there, and be ahead, for a bunch more chips you didn't have to bet.

Checking the turn also gives you the chance to hit your draws before putting your chips in, and by waiting you can do so with a 100% chance to win. Sure, some opponents may have a flush draw too and bluff you off the best hair pair of tens on a blank river, but that's the minority outcome.

Play it exactly as hero or 4-bet preflop to $1.5 mil with the intention of calling a 5-bet shove, or getting it all-in on most flops especially this one.

 
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Stephan1
over 7 years ago

With the stack size as they were and being 3 handed, I would have pushed all in putting pressure on the other player. You prefer a fold and not have to go to the river. If he doesn't, you have a strong draw and you have to win such flips to win a tournament. Another way to see it is can you find a better spot to take a huge lead at this juncture of the tournament?

If money was a real concern, just check and fold if you don't hit.

 
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pokerjosiah
over 7 years ago

I would just call here. The betting suggests that I am behind with a pair of 10s but the pot is offering 4 to 1 odds and the worst case I'm up against is A J or a set. I'm 4 to 1 against the straight and 3 to 1 against a set so I'm getting proper expressed odds so it's clear I can't fold here. Since my opponent has just half of the current pot left in his stack I would expect to mostly get all of his chips in on the river if I do hit my hand which makes the call even more clear.

I would consider raising all in here if I thought there was at least a 1 in 3 chance of getting my opponent to fold but I can't see him folding with so much in the pot so just calling is a better option.

If I miss on the river I will fold to a big bet. If I hit an A or 10 I will probably have to call and pay off a big hand because of the huge pot. Obviously if I hit a diamond or a jack I will get all in on the river.

 
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rmcjacket23
over 7 years ago

I think this all depends on what hero's read on the hand actually is. If I'm putting villain on bottom set or potentially two pair, I think I'm shoving the turn. We have plenty of outs against any hand that's not AJ, and there's the possibility that villain would lay down 88 or maybe even KQ in this spot (unlikely, but for the tournament life, I've seen worse folds).

If we put villain on a huge hand (KK, QQ, or maybe TT), then I think we can call and take a care off. These are certainly in his range given the 3 bet preflop. I think folding on the turn seems weak for this state in the tournament.

The only fear with just calling is if we see something like the Q,10 of diamonds on the river. It might be difficult to lay our hand down at that point.

 
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BPL37
over 7 years ago

You can't know whether you are ahead or not at this point. Even the best "reads" can be wrong. You are within reach of winning it all, so you better not make a bad move. If you call, you are getting great pot odds to justify paying for your draw. And you still can live to fight another day if the river isn't good to you. If you fold this hand, you shouldn't play tournaments--as Mick says, "you can't always get the nuts, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need." If you go all in, you are putting your chances of winning at grave risk and you are only getting even money on your incremental bet. Why take the risk of putting yourself out of contention when the payoff is only 1 for 1 and you don't know you are good? This is not a hard decision. Just call

 
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