Poker Coverage: Poker Legislation Poker Tournaments Poker Stories Podcast U.S. Poker Markets

Thumb_dustyschmidt

Tony G is on to Something...

by Dusty Schmidt |  Published: Dec 09, '11

Print-icon
 

About a month ago I decided that both in fairness to my students (it is definitely important for me as a coach to be actively playing so I can have a feel for the games in the same way my students do) and as a way to stay sharp, I needed to grind some poker. The problem is I had no money in my Black Chip poker account after donking off my initial deposit of $1,000 mostly messing around trying to win every pot I played goofing around at $100NL. I had a buddy who owed me $200 who had a Black Chip account so I told him to ship it to my Black Chip account and I began my grind.

I decided to forgo my 100 buy in rule for choosing which limits I played and went more the Tony G route and put my entire bankroll on 2 tables of $100nl and hoped to run good right off the bat or I would have to make an actual deposit. For those that aren’t aware of the what I am referring to regarding Tony G, Tony famously poked fun of internet players like me who suggest having large bankrolls and said if he had $400 he would play 3/6nl with it “because how else are you going to make any real money.” I always chuckle when I watch that video.

But hey, maybe Tony G is onto something because I put my $200 bankroll down on 2 tables and immediately ran it up to about $1,200 in the first couple of evenings of playing. I then took my $1,200 and put it down on 6 tables of $200nl and ran it up to about $5,000 in a matter of a few days. Once I had $5,000, I started sprinkling in some $400nl and higher, and as of this writing, have nearly $18,000 in my Black Chip Poker account! I now have approximately a 100k hand sample and am happy to report, have won about 7 big blinds per hundred over this sample. I am especially happy about this for 2 reasons. First off, it took me some time to remember all of the little plays I used to make in various situations and it also took me some time to adjust to the style of play of most of the regulars. I think my win rate is pretty solid, especially since the effect of the bad beat jackpots on Black Chip poker cuts into your win rate quite a bit vs. the rake on non bad beat jackpot tables. I feel like 75% of my tables are bad beat jackpots, which makes it kind of exciting thinking that any hand could be my lucky hand, but at the same time, I fully expect to never hit one of those and at the end of the day, for my win rate to be cut as a result.

It has been pretty fun grinding again. I tried to play 12 + tables for a few days and it did not go very well for me. I definitely took for granted how difficult it is to play great poker across so many tables. I have been able to do it my entire career, but right now I am not very good at it. I definitely need a lot of work firming up what my default lines are going to be in certain spots before I mass multi table. Which is fine because I am working on that quite a bit right now.

I haven’t mentioned this before, but while I have never personally met the guy, I sorta view Dr. Giggy as my unofficial coach. We play quite differently preflop, but postflop we are very similar. So I have been watching at least 1 video of his per day to try and get my thought process back to where I want it to be. I also am watching a lot of my previous “game film” that I have saved on my computer as a way to get back in the groove. Which brings up a good point. If you feel like you are really playing well, it is always a good idea to record some sessions when you are playing well so that way you can review them in the future. It is really good to record your play and play it back during downswings or any period where you feel like you are losing confidence. That’s my tip of the day, I guess you could say.

As I write this I am already anticipating some messages I might get asking why my PTR page doesn’t match what I am saying regarding my results at the tables. So I would like to get out in front of that and just say that you will have to take my word for it. PTR shows me as like a 2 big blind winner over 80k hands. I have played over 100k hand and it missed my best stretch of poker where I ran like Jesus and Moses put together for about 20k hands. It sure is accurate when I am getting my face kicked in, but seems to miss everything when I am running good! Oh well, I don’t personally care, but just don’t want to get 100 messages tomorrow or have some thread started calling me a liar haha. Yes, people have too much time on their hands sometimes haha. The little sleuths on 2+2 are something else with the way they try and investigate every little thing.

I want to remind everyone that the clock is definitely ticking when it comes to being able to get my two books, Treat Your Poker Like A Business and Don’t Listen To Phil Hellmuth. We are selling them at a fire sale price on Dustyschmidt.net By entering code DUSTY, you can take an additional 50% off the already reduced prices. We still don’t have an official date, but very soon Cardoza publishing will take over the rights to the books and they will be unavailable until they hit the book stores some time this Spring. By then the price will be much higher than it is right now. So please take advantage of this sale and get the books while you can. I think you will all enjoy them and find them helpful, so if you are on the fence about a poker book, just buy it because I can promise you that you will be glad you did.

Dusty Schmidt is the first ACR elite Pro at Americas Cardroom as well as an author and lead instructor at Bluefirepoker.com. Dusty is also the author of the books “Treat Your Poker Like A Business” and “Don’t Listen To Phil Hellmuth.” In his eleven-year online-poker career, Schmidt has played about 12 million hands and won over $5,000,000. He is a former Team PokerStars pro who for two consecutive years held the highest win rate at 5/10NL on Pokerstars. He is currently an active streamer on Twitch where he streams his play at AmericasCardroom and provides commentary on the hands as well as insight into the game of poker.

 
Any views or opinions expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the ownership or management of CardPlayer.com.