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Poker Stories Podcast: Chris Moorman Talks About Having To Rebuild After Staking Goes Wrong

Poker Stories Is An Audio Series That Features The Game's Best Players and Personalities

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Poker Stories is a long-form audio series that features casual interviews with some of the game’s best players and personalities. Each episode highlights a well-known member of the poker world and dives deep into their favorite tales both on and off the felt.

Chris Moorman is the no. 1 online tournament player in poker history, and it’s not even close. The 32-year-old U.K. poker pro has managed to rack up $14.2 million in online tournament earnings over the years, which is $3.3 million more than his nearest competitor, according to PocketFives.

Now based in the United States, Moorman has proven that he is quite the live player as well, with $5.1 million in earnings. After a few years of close calls in big events, he finally picked up a marquee win of his own in the WPT L.A. Poker Classic main event, and just last summer, he won his first World Series of Poker bracelet.

Highlights from this interview include playing cards with the elderly, why bullying leads to billiards, being no. 1, enjoying mince pie and Christmas pudding, having his dad act as his accountant, learning to close, an unsustainable stable of horses, writing his own book of Moorman, a fake friend named Adam, calling an audible on his proposal, a last longer to avoid a white suit, and the rush of bluffing Phil Ivey.

You can check out the entirety of the interview in the audio player at the top of the page or download it directly to play on the go from iTunes or your favorite podcast app.

Catch up on past episodes featuring Daniel Negreanu, Nick Schulman, Bryn Kenney, Mike Sexton, Brian Rast, Jean-Robert Bellande, Scott Seiver, Greg Raymer, Maria Ho and many more. If you like what you hear, be sure to subscribe to get the latest episodes automatically when they are released.