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Poker Hand of the Week: Koray Aldemir vs. Wai Kin Yong

Let Us Know How You Would Have Played The Hand

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Give us your opinion in the comments section below for your chance at winning a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

Ask any group of poker players how you played your hand and they’ll come up with dozens of different opinions. That’s just the nature of the game.

Each week, Card Player will select a hand from the high-stakes, big buy-in poker world, break it down and show that there’s more than one way to get the job done.

The Hand

With eight players left in the 2017 Triton Super High Roller main event in Manila, just two spots from making the money, sixth-place stack Koray Aldemir raised to 54,000 in the hijack. Wai Kin Yong, who won a Triton Super High Roller event in November, decided to three-bet to 144,000 on the button.

The blinds folded and Aldemir called. The flop fell 4Spade Suit4Heart Suit4Club Suit and Aldemir checked. Yong bet 82,000 and Aldemir called.

The turn was the 9Spade Suit and Aldemir checked. Yong bet 230,000 and Aldemir called again. The river was the JHeart Suit and Aldemir checked one final time. Yong asked to see his stack and then bet 600,000.

Aldemir, who had only 890,000 total left in his stack then went into the tank. Several minutes passed before Aldemir made the call, and Yong could only tap the table to reveal his AClub Suit2Club Suit for ace high.

Aldemir then showed his ADiamond SuitKClub Suit for a better ace-high, to drag the huge pot.

The Questions

What do you think of Yong’s button three-bet? Should Aldemir have four-bet with his big slick? What’s the best approach on a three-of-a-kind flop? What kind of range is Yong representing when he fires all three streets? What do you think of Yong’s bet sizing on the river? Would a shove have been more effective?

The Aftermath

After the hand, Wai Kin Yong was left with just 460,000 in chips. He was, however, able to sneak into the money, finishing in sixth place for HKD $2,224,000 ($289,120).

Aldemir took that pot and rode his newfound momentum to the win over Spain’s Sergio Aido and American Dan Cates after a three-way deal. Aldemir banked HKD $13,717,400 ($1,292,653) for the victory, bringing his career live tournament earnings to just over $4.2 million.

What would you have done and why? Let us know in the comments section below and try not to be results oriented. The best answer will receive a six-month Card Player magazine digital subscription.

 
 
 
 

Comments

taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung says first question is always what is taodung equity
Poker is game of reward vs risk (making it a mathematical puzzle)
Kory preflop equity is 64%
Wai preflop equity is 56%
Kory flop equity is 15%o (marginal)
Wai flop equity is 10% (weak)
Kory turn equity is 9%
Wai turn equity is 6%
Kory river equity is 2%
Wai river equity is 1%

Taodung ask how would you play the hand using equity

 
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taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung hand of the day
Cash game 25/50 6max
Preflop taodung calls a standard raise (2.5bb) from hijack and a call from cutoff and button taodung in bb with a5 suited diamonds (4 way pot)
Pot size 549
Flop is j(d)q(h)q(d) tadung equity is 28%
Täodung leads out with a half pot size bet (275) (risk) gets called by cutoff and button pot size is 1371 (3 way pot)
Turn īs 5s taodung equity is 21%
Taodung checks cutoff checks button also checks pot size still 1371
River 4d (bingo marked nut flush) taodung equity is 80% taodung bets 75% of pot (risk) cutoff calls button folds pot size 3427 (reward)
Taodung wins pot 3427 (reward)
And that's reward vs risk in action

 
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taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung will now use taodung poker calculator
(secret mathematical formula) that's computes equity of a poker hand
Based on the reward vs risk the max reward is Kory stack size and the max risk is also the Kory stack size ( 1350000 )
Flop pot size 356000
Kory (equity is 15%)checks wai bets (equity 10%) 820000 (18% of pot)(risk) giving Kory pot odds of 16% (risk) vs reward (15% vs 16%)

Turn Kory checks (equity 6%) wai bets 230000(risk)(45% of pot) giving
Kory pot odds of 23% but Kory equity is 6% (reward(6%)vs risk(25%)
Kory calls (Kory mistake is calling and commits himself to the pot)
Kory should fold or shove allin never call
And that's reward vs risk in a nutshell

 
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taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung says hand of the week
Yes Kory won the hand
Kory doesn't use poker math (pot odds)
But that's poker

 
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taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung says
Hand the week players profile
Kory loose passive (lp)cannot be buffed a fish
Wai is loose aggressive (lag) will buff and will bet for value and hates to check
Wai mistake was buffering a fish and making a big pot (a common mistake
for a lag)

 
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NoFear
8 months ago

This is an interesting hand because it really comes down to reading your opponent. When you are in the zone you know exactly what your opponent has - I call it reading their soul. That said, here are the questions posed:

What do you think of Yong’s button three-bet? It is aggressive, and I find no fault with it. The one bad choice would be to call.

Should Aldemir have four-bet with his big slick? He is playing out of position against an aggressive player, which can be tricky post-flop, so personally I favor the four-bet and taking the lead on the flop - and shoving to a five-bet. But Aldemir is perhaps confident in his ability to play post-flop, it is a personal preference in this situation.

What’s the best approach on a three-of-a-kind flop? That depends on the three-of-a-kind, the opponent, and your position. In this hand a check call is not a bad strategy if you have what you believe to be a good read and good reading skills. It controls the size of the pot, let's you see what your opponent does, and you still have an ace and a king that can snap off for you.

What kind of range is Yong representing when he fires all three streets? He is representing a pocket pair - any pair on the flop and turn, but on the river he is faced with a harder bet if his pair is smaller than a jack (unless he has 99). Or he could have AJ and spiked a J. His range narrows on the river to AA, KK, QQ, JJ, 99, and AJ and the first two are less likely with Koray holding AK.

What do you think of Yong’s bet sizing on the river? Would a shove have been more effective? It is an odd size. What is he trying to rep and get a call with? A smaller bet may be better - 380,000 would look like a value bet wanting to get called. If going big, he should have shoved, another viable alternative.

 
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taodungchi
8 months ago

Taodung stands corrected
Using reward vs risk (64%( koryvs preflop reward equity vs 25% (pot odds risk) ( after wai 3bet preflop ) The four bet shove all in by Kory is the move to make ( answers all the questions by cardplayer staffers and puts wai to the test )

Thank to nofear post for pointing that move out to taodung

 
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