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$2.5K MGM Main Event Part One

by Katie Dozier |  Published: Oct 31, '11

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The MGM $2.5K Main Event was one of the toughest field I’ve ever played in. Even the guys that could qualify to play in seniors events were seasoned lags (including the likes of Thor and Barry Shulman). Hell, even the one blonde chick in the tournament was pretty darn good if you asked me. ;)

My first table wasn’t actually horrible, because it had one fish at it. I picked up aces early and managed to get my stack up from 20k to 27k; we started 400 big blinds deep. Being as the WSOP Main starts 300 bbs deep, this was a very deep structure, with pretty much every added level imaginable. The dealers were also excellent. When 7-handed, I think my table saw almost 45 hands an hour.

I was moved to a new table that reeked of Black Friday—no one was over 30 and everyone seemed to know everyone’s name. One dude started talking about his various sunglasses purchases, including $3k on a pair (suddenly the $700 I spent on mine from Tiffany’s no longer seemed cool). I ended up playing a few hands with him.

Twice I bluff-check raised him on dry flops and got him to fold. His VPIP% was very high; even considering that he sat out almost an entire (60 minute) level.  Even just watching him play hands I wasn’t involved in was fun! His image got a call out of me in the following hand:

Blinds: 150-300/25

Action: Folded to me in the cut-off with J9o, I raised to 700.  ADZ called in the SB, everyone else folded.  We’re about 25k deep. The pot is about 2k.

Flop: J22

Action: He checks, I c-bet 800. One interesting thing about this tourney was that balancing was a more important consideration than normal because your opponents were for sure paying attention, and with the deep structure it was more likely you’d be at the same table for quite a while.  (I caught another well-known internet player that wasn’t balancing against me and was able to c/r bluff him on a wet-board because he bet ¼ of the pot, which he only did when weak.)

Turn: 2, check check. The pot is ~3,600.

River: A

Acton: He bets 3,100.

Obviously this river card sucks. Some real part of his floating range on the flop is Ax, but the flip side is that this is also a great bluff card in case he floated on the flop with something like KQ. If he had a jack, which he likely thinks is a strong part of his range, then a bet here could be an attempt to get me to fold instead of chopping, though most of the time I think he would check/call the river and likely lead the turn. It is similarly unlikely that he would bet a hand like 99, which he also would likely 3-bet pre out of position. His range here  is pretty polarized.

So am I winning this 32% of the time which would make the call good? I think that really comes down to how wide I think he called my c-bet. I had a pretty aggressive image, and I had bluffed him out of two similar dry flops before (though he didn’t know that they were bluffs). He had also shown a failed 5-bet bluff into quads earlier; so clearly he had a real bluffing range.

In order for it to be a good call, he actually only has to have a few bluffing combos in his range, assuming that he isn’t flatting all suited aces and a ton of off suit aces pre: KQs, KQo, T9s, 98s, T9o. I think that those hands are in his range the vast majority of the time (and since he also I think bets with a J some small % of the time) I think it is a close but good call, especially in a tournament where I’m not as concerned with having a large edge (due to the dense field).

So I called, and he flipped A6s.

After a couple of hours, the table was broken, and everyone was happy about this! Beforehand, some of the table talk had even focused on what an awful table it was. Four-betting pre was very standard; to stand out you had to 6-bet! It was like the pages of Raiser’s Edge coming to life lol.

To be continued! :)

Katie “hotjenny314” Dozier is a lead coach for Team Moshman and one of the Grindettes. An accomplished super-turbo and MTT player, she makes videos for Drag The Bar and PokerStrategy . Dozier, co-authored Pro Poker Strategy: The Top Skills and The Superuser. She posts more frequent updates on Twitter.

 
Any views or opinions expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the ownership or management of CardPlayer.com.
 

Comments

NYY2009Champs
6 years ago

Lol , who are you.. A quick search on P5s and it shows u have a whopping total of 50k in cashes on all online sites, and i cant even find your live results.. CP if ur gonna get women to start blogging, if they don't have results, please let them be at least attractive!

 
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adbuster2375
6 years ago

Lol NYY2009Champs in thinking that SNG scores are tracked by sites like P5s and CP. Hate away loser.

Great analysis Katie. Look forward to more.

 
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Katie_Dozier
6 years ago

Adbuster2375- thanks so much for your kind words. :) I'll be posting part two soon.

 
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NYY2009Champs
6 years ago

Ok sorry she has 14k profit in Sit n Go on FTP, 1k loser on Stars... 11kprofit on FTP for MTT, and 7k on stars.. And no results with cash games. Thats a whopping 30k profit... Pro material IMO lmfao adbuster ur just as dumb

 
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pokersucks
6 years ago

after reading this blog about ‘wet and dry flops’ “VPIP” “fish” “designer sunglasses” from this n00b combined with all the crap going on see: ftp scandal and ‘Epic’ poker league ( seriously whose going to watch that crap).. I officially realized after 8 years as a casual player/fan poker officially sucks and isn’t fun anymore to watch or play. im going to stop reading this garbage and would not in million years watch pros trade money around in all-in fests at Epic Poker League. The only decent thing a casual player/ fan is watching is High Stakes Poker or this new live coverage of WSOP has been interesting . Just my four cents. Peace out lamers

 
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Joe_Cortese
6 years ago

The point is that the game has/is evolived/ing. And the author exemplifies how that very process is taking place. If you don't understand or don't want to understand what she is saying, then you are living in denial. Living in denial is a one way ticket to the rail in both poker and life.

There's a ton of very different ways to look at the situation she describes. Folks like Jonathan Little and Oliver would analyze the mathematical results orientation ad nauseum until they finally arrive at a convincing equity based call.

Sidel would look at ADZ's glasses and know instantly that he was more than capable of floating an A6, regardless of his behavior (at that time, on that day, etc, etc,etc).

The point is that there were a ton of good reasons to FOLD instead of calling. Getting back to the results math, the point is that anyone who thinks the only valid commentary on poker coming from either a male or female that is valid enough to count is number of cashes, that's the opponent I want to be facing on that board anytime.

Katie, word of advice......my day usd to say; 'always give the next guy credit for being at least as smart as you think you are'....chuck the glasses!

Nice article, looking forward to pt.2. -Joe

 
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Katie_Dozier
6 years ago

Joe_Cortese: Thanks for your nice comments. Though it wasn't clear in the blog entry; I never wear sunglasses while I play. :)

 
 

LiquidKaos
6 years ago

Good breakdown ... hopefully we`ll see more blogs soon. I have a question though, and please understand I`m likely not as experienced as you are (I haven`t played in a 2.5k buyin event, for instance, lol).

Question: You talk about ``balancing``, which I assume means how often you`re c-betting, and how much of the pot you will be betting when you do. That being said - is 800 into a 2k pot an optimal size when you`ve hit a decent piece? What is the intention of the bet? What are you planning to do if he raises on the flop? (since that`s such a dry board, he could easily think he`s best, or have steal potential anyway)

Thanks for any reply - play well in future events, I hope to keep reading about them!

-LK

 
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LiquidKaos
6 years ago

Good breakdown ... hopefully we`ll see more blogs soon. I have a question though, and please understand I`m likely not as experienced as you are (I haven`t played in a 2.5k buyin event, for instance, lol).

Question: You talk about ``balancing``, which I assume means how often you`re c-betting, and how much of the pot you will be betting when you do. That being said - is 800 into a 2k pot an optimal size when you`ve hit a decent piece? What is the intention of the bet? What are you planning to do if he raises on the flop? (since that`s such a dry board, he could easily think he`s best, or have steal potential anyway)

Thanks for any reply - play well in future events, I hope to keep reading about them!

-LK

 
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Katie_Dozier
6 years ago

LiquidKaos: Thanks for your interest and question. If I had missed the flop, this is about the same about I would have c-bet. It is a dry board, so I do not want to bet a ton and therefore limit his range to mostly hands that have me beat (in addition to the balancing concerns).

So basically I think that betting close to full pot is problematic because it mostly gets worse hands to fold and better hands to call-- in addition to the fact that it wouldn't be balanced and my opponents are all pretty solid. Another problem with c-betting large would be increasing the size of the pot so dramtically.

If he check/raises when I've bet 800, then it is a pretty easy call (especially since I'd seen him bluff c/r dry flops before). However, if I make it 2k, and he decides to c/r to 5k, then suddenly I am faced with a much tougher decision (and he could get me to fold the best hand that way. Hope this makes sense, and thanks for your question! :)

 
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galego
6 years ago

I'd expect something this awful from Bluff, not CardPlayer.

 
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Katie_Dozier
6 years ago

Joe_Cortese: Thanks for your nice comments. Though it wasn't clear in the blog entry; I never wear sunglasses while I play. :)

Fredd_Deeb_2012: Thank you!

LiquidKaos: Thanks for your interest and question. If I had missed the flop, this is about the same about I would have c-bet. It is a dry board, so I do not want to bet a ton and therefore limit his range to mostly hands that have me beat (in addition to the balancing concerns).

So basically I think that betting close to full pot is problematic because it mostly gets worse hands to fold and better hands to call-- in addition to the fact that it wouldn't be balanced and my opponents are all pretty solid. Another problem with c-betting large would be increasing the size of the pot so dramtically.

If he check/raises when I've bet 800, then it is a pretty easy call (especially since I'd seen him bluff c/r dry flops before). However, if I make it 2k, and he decides to c/r to 5k, then suddenly I am faced with a much tougher decision (and he could get me to fold the best hand that way. Hope this makes sense, and thanks for your question! :)

 
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